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Smokingreader logo
Smoke-Free Workplace in Ireland, a one-year review
Office of Tabacco Control, 2005 (367k)
Enclosed workplaces became smoke-free by law in Ireland on the 29th March 2004 under provisions in the Public Health (Tobacco) Acts, 2002 and 2004. Since then offices, shops, factories, bars, restaurants and other enclosed workplaces have been smoke- free. click to download

The Beauty of Quitting
Irish Cancer Society, 2002 (112k)
Smokers lose an average of 10 -15 years of potential life. Smoking causes 90% of lung cancers in women. Smoking also greatly increases your risk of getting many other cancers, including cancer of the cervix. Smoking is a major risk factor for heart disease and causes bronchitis and emphysema. click to download

Growing up in smoke
Southern Health Board, 2002 (32k)
Growing up in smoke, Every day, thousands of young children have no choice but to breathe in second hand smoke, at home, in the home of a child minder, in the family car. While most adults can claim their right to breathe in clean air, this is not true for children. They have to depend on us as adults to make sure their air is smokefree. click to download

Information on Health and Smoking
Health Promotion Unit, 2002 (32k)
In Ireland about 6000 people die each year from smoking-related diseases. This is 10 times more than the number killed each year in road accidents. About a quarter of all regular smokers are killed prematurely by their smoking. Those killed lose on average 10-15 years of potential life. click to download

Quitting - you positive and supporting guide
Health Promotion Unit, 2003 (232k)
If you are a smoker, quitting is one of the best things you can do for your health. If you are one of the 7 in 10 smokers who wants to stop, this booklet can help you to succeed. click to download

Just be smoke free
Irish Cancer Society, 2004 (120k)
7,000 die each year in Ireland from smoking related diseases. 95% of lung cancers are caused by smoking. In Ireland one third of 15-17 year olds smoke. Half of those who continue to smoke regularly will die prematurely from a tobacco related illness click to download

Pack 'em in Stay Trim
Health Promotion Unit, 2003 (200k)
There are many benefits to being a non-smoker. Your risk of getting heart disease, lung cancer and other smoking related illnesses is less. Breathing problems will gradually disappear and your circulation will improve. You will smell fresher and feel fitter. Also, you will be free from the worry that you are damaging your health. click to download

Second-hand smoke
Office of Tabacco Control, 2004 (176k)
Second-hand smoking is the smoke a smoker blows into the air, and the smoke that drifts into the air from the burning end of a cigarette, cigar or pipe. click to download

Benefits of a smoke-free work place
Department of Health and Children, (440k)
The Smoke-Free Workplace has clear benefits for both the employer and the employee. click to download

Second-hand smoking
Department of Health and Children, 2005 (440k)
Second-hand smoke is often referred to as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or passive smoke. People who do not smoke are exposed to second-hand smoke when they share a space with someone who is smoking. click to download

Growing up smoke free
Irish Cancer Society, 2006 (1.4MB)
Second-hand smoke is a combination of: mainstream smoke – the smoke that is inhaled and then breathed out by the smoker; and sidestream smoke – the smoke that comes from the burning end of the cigarette. Only a small amount (15%) of smoke from a cigarette is inhaled by the smoker; the rest of it goes directly into the air. click to download

Quitting Smoking
Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute, 2006 (64k)
The health risk of a little weight gain is nothing compared to just how damaging smoking is for your health. The average person puts on around 6 to 8 pounds when they quit smoking. Some people may put on more – even up to 30 pounds. click to download

Smoking and Pregnancy
Health Promotion Unit, 2002 (32k)
At the start of pregnancy, your baby is very tiny but during the course of nine months it grows into a fully formed human being. It is well to remember that these nine months are the most important in your baby’s young life. During this time in the womb, your baby depends on you for everything. click to download

 
     
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