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Activities
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (208k)
If you can help the person with dementia to find activities that they still enjoy you will improve their quality of life as well as your own. You will need to be imaginative and flexible in adapting activities to their changing capabilities as well as to their different moods. click to download

Aggressive Behaviour
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (224k)
If you are caring for someone with dementia you may find that they sometimes seem to behave in a very aggressive way. They may be verbally abusive or threatening, for example, or kick or pinch or they may lash out violently at people or property. click to download

Carers - looking after yourself
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (224k)
It is all too easy to ignore your own needs when caring for someone with dementia and forget that you matter too. It is important to take steps to safeguard your own health and well-being, as well as other aspects of your life, so that you can continue to cope and retain your confidence. click to download

Communication
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (248k)
People with dementia should be encouraged to communicate in whatever way they can. The desire to stay in touch may be because you love them, or feel a sense of duty or responsibility towards them; possibly a mixture of both. Communication will help improve their quality of life and enable them to preserve their own feelings of identity for as long as possible. click to download

Continence Management
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (256k)
Continence management. Incontinence is often very upsetting and humiliating for people with dementia as well as stressful for carers. However, there are many ways in which you can help to prevent or manage incontinence which can improve the situation for everyone concerned. click to download

Dressing
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (208k)
Our clothes are very much part of our personality. Enabling someone with dementia to choose what they wear and retain their particular style of dressing is a way of helping them to preserve their own identity for as long as possible. As dementia progresses, the person may need more assistance with dressing. click to download

Driving and Dementia
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (232k)
Dementia impacts on both mobility and safety and it is important to consider both of these factors when faced with the issue of continued driving. When people have been driving for many years, they may not want to stop. Many people with dementia are able to drive safely for some time after diagnosis. click to download

Early Symptoms & Diagnosis
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (312k)
Alzheimerís Disease is a neurological condition characterised firstly by a progressive decline in a personís mental functioning. There is no single cause of Alzheimerís Disease, nor is there yet a cure for the vast majority of dementias of which Alzheimerís is the most common type. click to download

Eating
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (240k)
If you are caring for someone with dementia, you will want to try and ensure that they enjoy their food and that they eat a healthy, balanced diet. But mealtimes can be stressful, particularly as dementia progresses. Here are some suggestions. click to download

Explaining to children
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (200k)
When you are distressed about someone close who has dementia, it is easy to forget just how anxious and bewildered your children may feel. Children need clear explanations and plenty of reassurance in order to cope with the changing situation. click to download

Grief & bereavement
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (200k)
If someone close to you develops dementia, you are likely to experience feelings of grief and bereavement as the illness progresses, not just in the period after their death. click to download

Feeling of guilt
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (200k)
When caring for someone with dementia, you may experience feelings of guilt even when it seems that you are doing the best you can. Such feelings, which are very common among carers, may undermine your confidence and self-esteem, and make it harder for you to cope. click to download

Hallucinations & delusions
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (208k)
Some people with dementia may experience hallucinations or delusions. Of course not everyone with dementia will be affected and not everyone who has these problems has dementia. click to download

Legacies & bequests
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (240k)
Caring for carers, legacies and bequests click to download

Legal & financial arrangements
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (272k)
As dementia progresses you will find that the person you are caring for will find it increasingly difficult to manage their financial and legal affairs. click to download

Living alone
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (344k)
If someone close to you has dementia and is living on their own, you are bound to feel anxious about their ability to cope. Wherever possible, talk things over with the person concerned, with members of the family and with experienced professionals. click to download

Maintaining skills
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (248k)
As a carer you will want to ensure that the person with dementia makes the best use of their skills and abilities at each stage of the illness in order to preserve their dignity and confidence. click to download

Coping with memory loss
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (224k)
Coping with memory loss. Many carers find that dealing with memory problems is one of the most difficult aspects of dementia. There are some ways that carers can help the person with dementia cope with their memory problems. click to download

Pressure sores
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (200k)
If you are looking after someone with dementia, you will want to take particular care to ensure that they do not develop pressure sores. Older people who are not very mobile are particularly vulnerable. click to download

Safety in the home
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (240k)
If you are caring for someone with dementia, you will need to find the right balance between protecting them for the sake of safety and encouraging independence. Rather than wrapping the person in cotton wool and completely curtailing their freedom, you may need to accept that some minor accidents may occur. click to download

Sexual Difficulties
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (224k)
If you are caring for a partner with dementia there will be a great many changes in your relationship over time and these may include changes in your sexual relationship. click to download

Sleeping
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (232k)
Sleep is one of the most essential components of our well-being. If you and the person with dementia are to lead a healthy life, it is of vital importance that you both receive adequate sleep and rest. The following are some helpful hints which you as a carer may find useful to enable you both to have a restful night. click to download

Staying healthy
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (296k)
If you are caring for someone with dementia, you will want to ensure that they remain as fit and healthy as possible. The better the person feels the more enjoyment they are likely to get from life and the easier it will be for both of you to manage. click to download

Understanding Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (1.6mb)
The purpose of Understanding Alzheimerís Disease is to give you general information about Alzheimerís Disease and other dementias, and to highlight their early signs and symptoms. It is hoped this booklet will give you answers to the more frequently asked questions and therefore give you a better understanding of Alzheimerís Disease and dementia. click to download

Understanding the person with dementia
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (224k)
If you are caring for someone with dementia you will want to ensure that they are always treated with respect and dignity and as an individual person, however little they may seem to understand. click to download

Unusual Behaviour
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (312k)
People with dementia sometimes behave in ways that others find puzzling or difficult to handle. This advice sheet looks at a number of different behaviours and suggests ways of coping. Not everyone with dementia will be affected. click to download

Questions you may find useful
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (192k)
When you are worried that you or someone you care for may have Alzheimerís Disease or a related dementia, it can be difficult to think of all the questions you want to ask when you are with the specialist. click to download

Wandering
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (224k)
Wandering describes the pacing up and down, or the tendency to leave home to go for a walk and then be completely unable to find the way back again, which can be a feature of the behaviour of people with dementia. It is important to try to think why the person you are caring for wanders so that you can find a way of managing the situation. click to download

Washing & bathing
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (208k)
For most adults, washing is a personal and private activity. Carers need to be sensitive and tactful when offering help or when trying to persuade someone with dementia to keep clean. It is important to respect the personís dignity. click to download

Whoís who in dementia care
Alzheimer Society of Ireland, (304k)
If you are concerned about yourself or somebody close to you and start to have these concerns investigated, you will need to meet a number of different healthcare professionals. Each person will be responsible for different aspects of the condition and care. This is often referred to as the multi-professional team approach to dementia. click to download

 
     
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