Do you think that the morning after pill should be available over the counter in pharmacies?

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Anonymous  ·  23 Jun 2008
Any logic to support your argument there Anonymous?
 

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Anonymous  ·  22 Jun 2008
No
 

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Anon  ·  12 Dec 2007
There are progesterone only pills also so your argument does not stand.
 

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Siobhan (PKI66980)  ·  05 Dec 2007
yes they should
 

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Anonymous  ·  04 Oct 2007
The coil ois suitable for use up to fie days after unprotected sex so of course the later it is fitted, the more ineffective it is.
 

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Anonymous  ·  04 Oct 2007
The MAP is not the same as the pill. It contains only progestogen. The pill contains oestrogen also, which is the component which causes problems for most people.
The coil is actually more effective than the MAP but, as you say, a lot less comfortable to take.
 

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Anonymous  ·  04 Oct 2007
Untrue Anon, I can't take the pill on a long term basis but I have been perscribed the MAP as a one off with no problems. It's more effective than the morning after coil and involves far far less discomfort
 

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Anon  ·  03 Oct 2007
Anonymous, If you can't take the pill, then you can't take the MAP either because they are both made up of the same substance ie hormones!

I find it rather amusing that people say they can't take the pill but they can take the morning after pill. It just doesn't make any logical sense to me.
 

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Anonymous  ·  11 Sep 2007
Of course it should be. Accidents happen, it's not about teens being given a bad impression.
I'm in my mid 20's. In a stable relationship. Can't take pill in general. Accidents happen, I'm not ready for a child so morning after pill is my only option.It could be monitered to how often someone gets it, so they aren't getting it too often.
 

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Olivia  ·  20 Jul 2007
Aquarius,
How much did it cost you to get the MAP over the counter in Enniskillen?
Did the pharmacist take your daughters blood pressure or do any other medical checks to ensure she was suitable to take the MAP? (Some people aren't).
In the UK the MAP costs approx 30 (sterling) to buy.
Here, if you go to your local G.P. (I went to mine, out of hours service). I paid 50 euros, (my friend didn't have to pay a penny as she had a medical card) and got the MAP given to us there and then, along with the advice slip that came with it re. side effects etc so that I was prepared for any side effects that I might have. I also got a screening from the Doctor. So, I feel I got a better service and I didn't have to travel anywhere other than my local out of hours G.P. service.
All in all, I think that was a much better service, much better value for money, (no prescription)much better health care and no judgement whatsoever.
In fact, the nurse who spoke to me before I seen the Doctor was very informative, friendly and very helpful all in all.
 

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Anonymous  ·  19 Jul 2007
Well, let me tell you this. For the first time ever I had to request the MAP. I am in my 30's and am unable to take the contraceptive pill due to it making me quite ill. So, I required the MAP. I rang my Dr who basically told me he'd leave a perscription out for me. I collected it and went to my local chemist. The pharmacist came out to me and she was so lovely. Explained that the old pill used to make people sick, but that this one doesn't. However, if by some fluke I did vomit within 3 hours of taking it, to come back to them straight away and they would replace it FOC. She said the main thing to do is take it immediately. Basically, what I am saying, is that she was more informative than the Dr. He told me none of this !
 

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Aquarius  ·  19 Jul 2007
A very definite YES. While pro active contraception is the ideal we do not live in a utopia and must face up to the facts."Accidents" and unplanned sexual encounters happen. I brought my daughter for the MAP in Enniskillen . The pharmacist did a full comprhensive interview with her in private before giving her the MAP. excellent service and very non - judgemental.
 

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Anonymous  ·  24 May 2007
So, a woman who is vomiting three hours after taking the tablet is supposed to make her way back to the clinic / doctor to take an anti-emetic.

- like I said, ludicrous.
 

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Emma  ·  24 May 2007
Anonymous, you obviously did not even read what I said.
The most common MAP now given consists of 1 tablet and 1 tablet ONLY.
The advice given with the tablet is that if you get sick within a 3 hour period you need to take the tablet again BUT whilst it makes some women nauseous it very rarely if ever, actually makes them sick so they do not need to go back.
IF the rare occurrence is sickness and they need to take it again, they are not charged a 2nd time.
Because the side effect of actual vomiting within the 3 hours is so rare, the need for anti-emetics is not there for the obvious reason that there is no need to give an anti-emetic if there is no reason to do so.
What do you not understand?
I never said that Pharmacists were not educated to give advice but a busy Pharmacist is not always in a position to check out the necessary medical contra indications and usually just refer to the leaflet that is issued with the medication.
Just the same as a Pharmacist is not in a position to tell me if the OC is right for me or not.
They dispense using their knowledge but they are not there to prescribe meds that can have serious (in some cases) contra indications.
 

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Anonymous  ·  24 May 2007
So, now you think pharmacists have no medical / perscribing knowledge whatsoever?

Emma, you're saying that a women should take one tablet , go about her daily busienss and have to return from wherever she is, three hours later, probably in the middle of the day and pay another 50 to get the second tablet, which she should have gotten in the first place anyway??
Ludicrous.
 

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Emma  ·  23 May 2007
Anonymous, The most up-to-date MAP is only 1 tablet.
Anti-emetics are not normally prescribed BUT anyone talking the MAP is, or should be told, about the fact that they may become nauseous.
If they are sick within 3 hours, they have to return for a 2nd tablet.
The average cost of the MAP in the UK is 30+ euros and that is without any medical assessment whatsoever so for the sake of a few extra bob I would rather err on the side of safety and have myself checked out before taking it rather than no medical supervision whatsoever.
It is not a money issue, it is a health issue.
 

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Anonymous  ·  22 May 2007
The MAP contains 750mcg per tablet. The full dose of 2 tablets amounts to 1500mcg.
 

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Anonymous  ·  22 May 2007
"both the OCP and the MAP contain levonrgestrel. POINT PROVEN".
What point is proven, exactly? The OCP also contains oestrogen which has more side effects than progestogens, such as increasing the risk of thrombosis and certain cancers.

Just because anti-emetics are prescribed for certain conditions, doesn't mean they are side effect free. They can cause neurological disturbances, particularly in young adults. They are certainly not needed by the majority of women taking the MAP. You are surely not suggesting they should be routinely taken, regardless?
 

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Emma  ·  22 May 2007
No Anonymous, that is clearly not what I said or implied.
Lots of meds can be sold OTC but the health of the patient/client/woman is THE most important angle and some meds need to be prescribed under medical supervision due to the make up of those meds, their interaction with other meds and also because of the side effects and contra indications.
HRT is not sold OTC either is the OC so why should the MAP?
Anyone taking any of these hormone based meds need to have some sort of medical supervision first to make sure they are suited to that med.
I think that is sensible and is the right procedure for the patient/client/woman so why do you see it as a problem?
 

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Anonymous  ·  22 May 2007
So using the reasoning of the MAP being certified as safe is pointless??
So was Aulin/Mesulid and indeed HRT and now we all know what happened with them?

So what do you propose - that no one ever take any medication at all when they need it and just throw out all medical research and advice done over the last 50 years??

Best of luck to you with that endeavour.
 

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Emma  ·  21 May 2007
To Anonymous Posted: 21/05/2007 08:49

Actually, The most common MAP is only 1 tablet and is NOT given with an anti-emetic.
As Anonymous 13:00 & 13:09 stated, you don't actually seem to know anything at all about the MAP.
I am in full agreement of the MAP but nevertheless I don't think it should be freely available without medical advice.
By the way, using the reasoning of the MAP being certified as safe is pointless.
So was Aulin/Mesulid and indeed HRT and now we all know what happened with them?
 

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Anonymous  ·  21 May 2007
If the woman needs anti nausea meds (or meds for cramping) they should be perscribed.
As for anti nausea meds - which are perscribed for everything from morning sickness to those undergoing chemo - having more side effects than the MAP??? You cannot be serious.
Both the MAP and the OCP conain levonorgestrel - POINT PROVEN.
If the MAP has 500mcg of levonorgestrel only - then why are two tablets needed?????

Homer, taking the MAP is a form of taking responsibility when a contraceptive fails.
A heck of a sight more responsible than an unanted pregnancy or indeed an abortion.
 

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Anonymous  ·  21 May 2007
Oh and anonymous: I've just read your previous posts and should point out that the modern MAP does not contain exactly the same ingredients as the ordinary contraceptive pill. Your average contraceptive pill has oestrogen in it and about 150mcg of the progestogen levonorgestrel. The MAP has l500mcg of levonorgestrel only.
 

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Anonymous  ·  21 May 2007
I don't know where you got your information, anonymous, but the MAP nowadays is 2 tablets that you take together, at the same time and often in view of the doctor. It used to be 2 tablets taken 12 hours apart, but never a "series".
An antiemetic is not routinely prescribed with it as the incidence of nausea and vomiting is low. 1 in 5 women may experience nausea to some degree and 1 or 2 in a hundred may vomit. It makes no sense for the other 98 to take drugs they don't need. The anti-nausea tablets probably have more side effects than the MAP!
Could this be yet another expamle of someone holding forth on a subject they really don't know that much about?
 

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Homer  ·  21 May 2007
Hello
NO I do not agree.
Responsibility should be taken on board between couples / partners.

Live well be well

 

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Anonymous  ·  21 May 2007
i always thought it was freeably available in pharmacies..didnt realise one has to go to a doctor..shows wat i know!!
 

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Anonymous  ·  21 May 2007
What level of hormones (over and above the natural level within the body) do you think is safe to pump into young girls/women?

The same levels of homone that are in the pill/ map have been vcertified as safe for use - which incidentally are way way Way lower than the amount of hormones flooding through a womens body when she is pregnant.

As for the GP who has the girl take the tablet in from of them - this is a nonsnse because as anyone kinows it is npot one tablet but a series of them which needs to be taken along with anti-nausea meds which any dr. should be perscribing aloing wiht the MAP.
 

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Emma  ·  20 May 2007
To Anonymous 12:06 - What level of hormones (over and above the natural level within the body) do you think is safe to pump into young girls/women?

To Anonymous 16:31 - Do you think that you are going to get the MAP free OTC?
Also, young girls and students are on no or little income and therefore are entitled to medical cards, therefore the MAP actually does not cost them anything so being able to buy it OTC is of no benefit to someone on a medical card because without a prescription from a doctor they would have to pay for something that otherwise would be free!

Most G.P.'s that I know will not prescribe the MAP but will insist that (after checking the patient/client/woman/girl) they take the table there and then in front of them. So they might pay the Doctors fee but they do not pay extra or seperately for the MAP.
 

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Anonymous  ·  20 May 2007
Yes definitely it should. besides anything else the cost of drs fees is a disgrace especially 4 younger girls and students who might not have any way to get the cash.
 

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Emma  ·  13 May 2007
Exactly, Anonymous, so what is the point in having the MAP sold OTC when the real issue is contraception?
A high percentage of girls taking the MAP don't bother with any contraception because they know they can get the MAP. All a bit pointless don't you think?
 

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Anonymous  ·  11 May 2007
Emma the MAP has the same constituents as athe pill in higher doses. iIt is suitable for one use per cycle and speculation on what if's and might have's is useless.
If a woman needs it every month then it is obvious that what she needs is contraceptive advice and the use of a suitable relaible contraceptive.
 

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Emma  ·  10 May 2007
Anonymous, I don't think that was what Plum meant. I think she was saying that because girls know the MAP is available (and more so, if it was OTC) they don't think about contraception AT ALL and then run the much higher risk of STD's.
Maybe I am wrong, if so I'm sure she will correct me but that is what I read from her posting.
I would agree with her. It would be a backward step to have the MAP sold OTC for a variety of reasons.
There was an article in the London Times about the MAP recently and if you seen what it is made of, you wouldn't touch it with a bargepole.
Doctors have a duty to explain the MAP to girls who want it, pharmacist, with all the best will in the world, would not be taken seriously.
I too, believe that the MAP will have some very serious consequences down the road for the health of us women. Yes, by all means, it is great for those that are caught out once in a blue moon but there are vast amounts of girls who are using it as a form of contraception. Paying the GP/locum Doc doesn't hinder them whatsoever so money is not the problem here, as far as I'm concerned. My only issue is the overuse of heavy duty hormones mixed with steroids on a regular basis.
 

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Anonymous  ·  09 May 2007
I have mixed feelings about this. I myself have taken it once and luckily had the finances to attend a clinic to do so. I worry that if it is brought in over the counter that many people will be too casual in using contraceptive, also isn;t there a limit to the number of times that one can take it?? personally i think it would be more beneficial if they reduced the cost of condoms, how any teenager can afford a box these days is beyond me, its not exactly encouraging safe sex.
 

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Anonymous  ·  08 May 2007
Plum, making the MAP available in pharmacies would not mean these women would somehow be more prone to STDs
 

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Plum  ·  04 May 2007
NO, NO, NO I work in a STD clinic and the amount of women who have careless sex esp on the weekends and pop the morning after pill is UNREAL and think its A TREAT. If you came and seen the amount of women who have a STD because of the MAP so called TREAT you would change your mind. Oh and by the way most of the women are in their late 20s early 30s.
 

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Jenny  ·  02 May 2007
Sarah, there is a doctor on call in every rural area.

Just because pharmacists give it out in the UK does not necessarily mean it is the right thing to do.
How can a busy city centre pharmacist ask the questions or be expected to do a health screening?

If, as suggested above, the tax payer would have to subsidise the pharmacist then what is the point?
The client would get better value for money by going to her Doctor and getting a proper screening.

Wait and see. There will be some very nasty side effects raising their ugly heads in the next 30 years in the same way as we were all force fed HRT for years and now, no decent G.P. will prescribe it without telling you all the negatives.

Homer, just an afterthought. How can you be serious in that post you wrote last? The logic of it defies understanding.
 

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Anonymous  ·  30 Apr 2007
Homer, what has your view that foetus is a life got to do with disagreeing with the MAP - which prevents an unwanted pregnancy?
Totally illogical.
 

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Homer  ·  29 Apr 2007
Hello
A definite no. Why Doctors should know who are in need of the morning after pill. It might not suit some health.
I am also against the pil as it is & I have arued this point from the start a Foetus IS A PERSON a gift of life. I will say no more on this matter.

Live well be well

 

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Sarah  ·  29 Apr 2007
I definitely think it should be available in pharmacies. As said before all young people are not the same but accidents do happen. I had to get the MAP recently because my OCP was affected by antibiotics and then the condom broke. I was lucky that I could get to a doctor early on a saturday morning but for some girls out in the country it may be a lot harder or impossible to get a doctor at the weekends. Other countries sell it over the counter so why not here? When are we going to move into the new millenium?!
 

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Anonymous  ·  26 Apr 2007
Let's take our heads out of the sand and make the MAP available OTC in pharmacies. I think that a good pharmacist would be well qualified to advise girls and women buying it and take the pressure off GP surgeries and A&E depts. I also think that the pharmacist should be reimbursed for providing the MAP and giving advice.
 
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