Dermatologist Vs. Pediatrician

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2 Posts

emer (CKD70722)  ·  22 Jul 2008
why are ye all arguing over this? everyone is entitled to their own beliefs and we should all respect other people opinions aswell. My son is nearly 6 yrs old and has both eczema and asthma since he was born. to be honest I find the asthma easier to control but the eczema has literally broke my heart. I have been to dermatolgists, faith healers, cranioligists, holistic therapists, and do you know what I feel so sad that my child is still suffering and scratching at night. I really hope this is his cross to carry in life as it is torture.
 

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Anonymous  ·  30 Jan 2005
I started reading this discussion months ago as my daughter has bad skin problems. i wanted to smack wiliam in the mouth as i thought he was so rude and aggressive to people who were sharing their experiences in good faith.
Months later i stumble on this discussion again and guess what ....hes still at it.
And you know, i dont want to slap him any more. I have to admire his dedication to his beliefs - facts - he will argue. Fair play to ya William.
 

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lizzie (HYV23145)  ·  23 Jan 2005
Who says they\'re cured? . These things may make you feel good for a while - especially if you feel you\'re getting one over on the \'Conventiional medicine\' believers, but long term, quacker is quackery and nothing more.
I do believe that a positive attitude can help cure what ails you - thats why reiki, aromatherapy, refloxology, etc seem to work short terme - you\'ve just spent 30 mins in a calm relaxing atmosphere with someone rubbing you or talking to you in a soothing manner. Great pick me up, but not a cure for medical problems.
 

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Anonymous  ·  19 Jan 2005
If they are all quakery Des, how come so many are helped by them when conventional treatment failed?
 

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deswalsh  ·  19 Jan 2005
Yeah Go William!
I dont have time for \'quackery\' myself, 99.9% of these alternative \'remedies\' arep ure crap. What I love best though is that people seem to think that if something is \'chinese\' and \'ancient\' then it must be reaaly good. Where did this notion come from? Its just a mish-mash TV-spouted new age hippy think IMHO. You only have to look at the health of the average chinese person (in China, not your local take-away)) to see that they are in the main not a particularly healthy bunch. If these oriental cures are so super howcome a couple of billion chinese still need to have doctors?
Having said that my wife insisted we try homeopathy, the most quack of all quacky cures, to help with our daughters awful eczema. Did it work..... hell no, but then it was a bottle of about 10ml water that cost me €25 (€250/litre!!)
After a few weeks of trying to be open minded I get out the betnovate and it cleared up in a couple of days like it always does.
Go figure.
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  19 Jan 2005
I might start by pointing out that unlike most people posting I use my name. I cannot lump together “Anon’s” different posts to decide their set of beliefs so you have me at a disadvantage there. Is pointing out illogical thinking, pseudo science, quackery, fraud, errors in fact, a tirade? I think not. Scientists, the medical establishment, the Gardai and the politicians are doing absolutely nothing to stop the wholesale & daily fraud of hundreds of thousands of Irish people by quacks & snake oil salesmen. It is a shame on them that they allow this to continue. They obviously couldn’t care less about the many poor and ill people being defrauded. I belong to the Irish Skeptics movement and we DO believe that something should be done about this situation. The main thing is education. If people were properly educated in scientific matters most of the CAM industry would collapse. It’s funny, many people do attack me but rarely on the basis of what I say. There is an obvious similarity in most of those matters mentioned above. The main one is they are superstitious, non scientific, new age and illogical. This is not insulting people. I do not insult people who are JW’s by saying there is no God. There is either a God or there isn’t. For me to say there is no God is no more an insult to religious people than for them to say there is a God is an insult to atheists. In the “fat people” thread I merely pointed out that to reduce weight one must eat properly and that exercise alone was not the correct solution. No one has managed to prove me wrong on this and in fact most posters do reluctantly agree with me. I can hardly be wrong; there has been a huge increase in childhood obesity in parallel with the increase in the eating of fatty & sugary highly processed food. The two are obviously connected. I might add that this forum is an excellent way for people to share their opinions who would otherwise never meet.
 

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Anonymous  ·  19 Jan 2005
William why do you insist on insulting people? You are basically telling anyone who disagrees with you that they are stupid and are inevitably going to be conned. I personally think it's a con that I have to pay 40 euro to a GP for a three minute consultation and then be told I need bed rest. But that is my choice and I don't criticise anyone else's belief that this is money well spent. If as an adult I want to choose an alternative, then it is up to me to seek out information and make an informed choice. Why can't you accept that?
 

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Anonymous  ·  19 Jan 2005
Wiliam launches a tirade on overweight people, complementary therapies, vitamins, colonic irrigation, web-based pharmacies and Jehovah's witnesses and possibly anything else he can find.
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  19 Jan 2005
If you believe in magic then you probably will be conned by those who exploit people with such beliefs and there is nothing I can do about it. Any adult who believes in magic in 2005 after 400 years of scientific discoveries is a lost cause.
 

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Anonymous  ·  19 Jan 2005
Yes William I do believe in magic. What tirade are you going to launch on me now?
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  18 Jan 2005
Unlike Reiki, conventional medicine is not magic. There are no cures yet for certain ailments. I think saying, “the medical community … have let people down” is an odd statement. Doctors never claimed to cure everything. Strange isn’t it that there are no shortages of non medical people who have cures for everything? Re Anonymous Posted: 18/01/2005 16:49, I was replying to Anonymous 18/01/2005 15:25 and 18/01/2005 13:56. Are you suggesting I ignore people’s direct questions to me? If people suggest magic as solutions to illnesses then I do feel obliged to point out that magic doesn’t work. If others did then I would happily leave the matter to them. Do *you* believe in magic then? It’s quite obvious reading these threads that a lot of people are being conned and then passing on the con which will result in others being conned. Do you not think I should advise people to avoid what I know to be fraud? Would you not advise people if you knew that they were to be robbed?
 

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Anonymous  ·  18 Jan 2005
Yes, you're right - the community does wash their hands of these people - the medical community. The reason so many people fall for these is not lack of education but the fact that conventional medicine has completely let them down
 

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Anonymous  ·  18 Jan 2005
William will you please stop hijackig discussions to spout off your own beliefs. If you want to start a discussion on why you think alternative medicine is bad/magic/a con, then please feel free to do so. But some of the people here would actually like to hear what others have to say without hearing you constantly rubbishing their views. You've made your viewpoint known, now move on to your own discussion.
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  18 Jan 2005
Reiki is completely based on magic. Do you believe in magic? Anyone who attended a Reiki session couldn’t possibly be *really* sceptical as Reiki is so totally daft that only someone already out of touch with *reality* could even consider it. Reflexology is based on the notion that massaging the foot can affect the organs, yet there is no direct connection between the tissues of the foot and the organs so it couldn’t possibly work. You really do need to do a bit of reading. The reason so many people fall for these extreme “new age” magic rituals is because they know absolutely nothing about science or the real world. They do in many ways live in a non real fantasy world of magic, spells, wizards & superstition. The “Reiki Masters of the Universe” exploit these vulnerable people and take their money from them. They are laughting at you all the way to the bank. Often the people so exploited are not very clever to put it mildly, are the worst educated and the poorest. They should be protected by society but instead society washes its hands of these people and lets them be conned. Shame on those in a position of power who could stop this but don’t. These frauds amount to millions of Euros in Ireland alone every year.
 

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Anonymous  ·  18 Jan 2005
I know of people who have attending Reiki and reflexology practitioners who were exremely skeptical to start with but who changed their minds conpletely when they realised how much it helped them. Perhaps you should open your mind and give it a try.
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  18 Jan 2005
\"How then do you explian all the people who are helped by Reiki, acupuncture...\". The answer is very simple. they aren\'t helped in the slightest but, and this is only stating the obvious, a con cannot work unless people THINK they are NOT being conned. People THINK that they are helped when they are not, this is part of the art of the confidence trickster. No one who is ever conned thinks there are being conned, do they?
 

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Anonymous  ·  18 Jan 2005
How then do you explian all the people who are helped by Reiki, acupuncture - practised for many many years in Chine, reflexology and even homeopathy.
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  18 Jan 2005
This is a very important point, “Surely you don\'t begrudge the child trying this if it helps alleviate her suffering”. It is important for a number of reasons. It connects two concepts that are not connected, i.e. trying something unproven “if it helps her suffering” as if the very act of trying different “cures” actually helped. There are literally thousands of quack cures and treatments NONE of which work in the slightest. Think about the logical consequence of this. Does everyone who is ill and cannot be cured immediately by medicine try every one of the thousands of quack cures? Obviously not. It’s not possible. Selling unproven quack cures (aka in the wild west Snake Oil Salesmen) RELIES on the fact that people are desperate. The ill people try quack cures in the mistaken hope that small and all that the chances are that they will work, they estimate that the cost and effort is worth the risk BUT that only applies if they sometimes or some of them work some of the time. The point is NONE of them work EVER on ANYONE. Unless you believe in the magic that most quack cures and remedies are based on, trying them is worse than useless and illogical. We already have a suggestion here that a non medical parent is going against the wishes of their doctor and stopping medical treatment to TRY quack cures that most definitely do not and CANNOT work as they are based on magic. Some cures that are based on old fashioned magic are; Magic Potions , Homeopathy, Reiki, Acupuncture, Reflexology, Noni Juice, Magnetic & Copper Bracelets etc. What really gets me is that so many people are prepared to be defrauded in broad daylight JUST because they are desperate as if their brains go out the window as soon as they are ill. You wouldn’t go to a quack mechanic with your car or a quack accountant but people do go to quack medicine in their millions. Amazing isn\'t it!
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  18 Jan 2005
"We tried all the alternative medicine and finally found a man with a cure". Please explain if this man has a cure for eczema how he is not a billionaire?
 

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Anonymous  ·  18 Jan 2005
Surely you don't begrudge the child tryign this if it helps alleviate her suffering.
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  18 Jan 2005
The reason ill people are being conned out of their hard earned money is that medicine cannot cure everything and sick people turn to quackery in desperation. Those that exploit the sick know this and make a very good living from it. People say, “sure what’s the harm in trying xyz”. But the result of this piece of faulty logic is that con artists can make a good living because of it. If you buy some quack cure then the company selling it makes a profit. It doesn’t matter to them if it works or not if enough people “try it”. Furthermore, if you buy a product and the ailment naturally fades away over time, which most do, you are inclined to think that the product cured it, when it didn’t. Trust your doctors, they are highly trained. If these health scams, diets, pills & magic potions worked then they would become part of conventional medicine. It is nothing short of a national scandal that these fraudsters are allowed to continue to peddle fake cure-alls that have no clinical evidence to prove they work. Most children grow out of this ailment so the future may not be so bad. My son had it bad as a child and by 12 or so it was gone completely.
 

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Anonymous  ·  18 Jan 2005
Malcolm, we tried Protopic as perscribed by our dermotologist but it did not work for us. I was equally concerned about using steriods for a long period of time as I believe that they must be doing harm. My daughter was also on a lot of antibiotics. She has not had allergy testing but from her blood test and other reactions it was diagnosed that she is allergic to eggs, fish and nuts (so much so, we now carry an Anapen injection around with us). We tried all the alternative medicine and finally found a man \'with a cure\'. This has been very successful for us (but its obviously not for everyone) I found the problem with conventional medicine is that because they do not know what causes it, then they have no real solution. I sympathise with the scratching, sleepless nights and distress and I think this has all had a toll on my daughter as I feel she is \'war weary\'. I think that if you have not experienced it then you have no clue about the devastating effects of it. I found the dermatologist to be condecending and dismissive of the alternative treatment but the results were there to see. Some things that I know irritate her are: salt, tomatoes, oranges, baby yogurts, strawberries - so we avoid those. Good luck to you.
 

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malcolm (milon)  ·  17 Jan 2005
My son is 14 mnths and has had bad eczema from the age of 3 mnths. To keep it under control (i.e. not wet and weeping/bleeding my I have had him on hydocortizone creams for the past 10 mnths as prescribed by my GP. I am HUGELY concerned about side effects, but find myself backed into a corner. I don't think people really understand how awful this condition is.. lack of sleep continuous itching, but worst of all not knowing if/when it will ever go away. I have heard of the new drug 'protopic' which I am told is not licenced for children under the age of 2 so is no good to me yet, does anyone out there have any veiws on this drug or any other advice that might help? I have not been to an allergist as I am told the testing is exremely unreliable. I have just started him on a 'pectin-free' diet.. has anyone heard of this working? I can understand this debate about alternative medicine.. conventional medicine can do nothing more for me and I am open to trying anything that works! Anything advice at all would be a help.
 

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Anonymous  ·  10 Oct 2004
An interesting example of WHY people believe in acupuncture cropped up Thursday of last week on the Marian Finucane radio program. Marian said that she suffered from migraine and went to an acupuncturist some years ago. She said that she was free from pain for a year afterwards. Obviously I don’t know the exact details; had she stopped her medication at the same time (she said she was on medication), did she change her diet at the same time (some foods cause migraine, chocolate, larger etc.), did the pain fade away or disappear immediately, did it go away as soon as she had the acupuncture or weeks later and when exactly did it come back etc. However Marian believes in acupuncture as a cure to migraine. Her experiences are very common. I know the acupuncture didn’t cure her migraine as magic does not work. I had a similar experience. When I was about 16 I had very bad migraine, tunnel vision the lot. By 24 I was getting it from time to time and could have had gone to an acupuncturist, I didn’t. I might have started taking an ancient Chinese herbal medicine, I didn’t. I didn’t even take any medication (there wasn’t any then). However, I had one last severe attack when I was 24 and since then nothing. I haven’t had a migraine attack of any description in 25 years. Now let’s say around that time I did get acupuncture, presto I would be telling everyone that acupuncture cured me. Worse still if I had bought some Chinese herbal concoction that one took daily, I might still be taking it 25 years later and telling everyone down the hairdressers that only for my ju ju I would have migraine. Obvious isn’t it how people are fooled?
 

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Anonymous  ·  07 Oct 2004
I logged onto the site you referred to, which I have used before, and searched by Acupuncture. There are plenty of hits and I read the first 12 of them. Most said there was no evidence that Acupuncture helped anything. Virtually all said something all the lines of this, “The quality of the included trials was inadequate to allow any conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture. More research with high quality trials is needed.” Now remember this comment is made after 30 years of acupuncture use in the west. Several referred to Meta Studies where someone studies many studies and from this the most common comment, and this is universal when referring to all CAM studies that seem to indicate an effect, e.g. “There is insufficient evidence to either support or refute the use of acupuncture (either needle or laser) in the treatment of lateral elbow pain” or “There is not enough evidence to make recommendations about the value of acupuncture in asthma treatment” or “Further research needs to consider the complexities and different types of acupuncture”, or another, “The evidence summarised in this systematic review does not indicate that acupuncture is effective for the treatment of back pain.” Furthermore one study showed that all the acupuncturists tested carried out totally different “treatments” which indicates that sticking pins anywhere is as good as anywhere else. Some “doctors” who themselves believe in Acupuncture do studies that in my opinion do not select enough patients to be statistically relevant, do deliberately shoddy studies, do not carry out double blind studies, do not remove the placebo effect and produce vague results. I suspect many of these tests are designed to confuse and are used more for propaganda than science. Finally, there is no agreed theory behind acupuncture, other than magic and I have even heard doctors who use acupuncture state that the theory behind it is obviously rubbish. The reverse of Garret Fitzgerald’s famous comment perhaps. WG
 

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Anonymous  ·  07 Oct 2004
If you check out the medscape.com website - one of the U.S. premier medical websites, you will find dozens or articles written by qualified doctors, surgeons and anesthetists all over the US, on the clinically approved effectiveness of acupuncture for everything from period pain to headache to IVF procedures. Check it out.
 

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Anonymous  ·  07 Oct 2004
Regarding acupuncture and pain management. The simple fact is that some small number of doctors have been fooled into thinking some CAM treatments have merit. Just like there are stupid computer programmers, TDs, bus drivers, there are stupid doctors. I would not read too much into this. There are millions of doctors in the world and the fact that a few think that CAM works is only to be expected. It would be even more weird if none at all did. However there is no evidence that acupuncture works at all. For decades now acupuncture has been used to treat probably every illness under the sun. Thousands of different ailments. I suppose it’s only to be expected that there is some tiny side effect of sticking needles into people that looks like a cure. Pain IS a very subjective thing and does come and go naturally There is a tiny chance that sticking a pin into you might ease pain but so does swishing cold water in your mouth when you have a toothache. Saying that acupuncture is OK as a treatment for all sorts of illnesses that it has clearly failed to be proven to cure but trying to justify it on the basis of a tiny bit of evidence that it might ease pain in the subjective opinion of some patients in some cases is seriously clutching at straws.
 

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Anonymous  ·  07 Oct 2004
Of course vaccination against somethig like smallpox or tb is a very positive thign but if you want to read about the other side of vaccination, try http://www.jabs.org.uk
 

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Anonymous  ·  07 Oct 2004
The web site that is displayed when you put in “The Vaccination Business” also claims, AIDS is not caused by HIV, water “is a programmable crystal” that can be energised to cure cancer, supports Homeopathy, claims that aliens have abducted people and cloned them, they quote David Icke who thinks he is God or is it Jesus? This is one of the daftest web sites I have ever read. If you want a good laugh see here for the root site http://www.trunkerton.fsnet.co.uk/Are you seriously saying that the eradication of smallpox which was brought about by vaccination was a mistake?
 

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Anonymous  ·  05 Oct 2004
Perhaps William that's you'll tell us all about these many Reiki centres that you've seen n top of hills. And yes people once believedthatthe earth was flat becuase to them, it had to be - they were wrong. You believe that complementary mendicine is is rubbish perhaps . . .
If acupunture is such bunkum how come in the UK and the US acupunturists work with pain management specialists (qualified in conventional medecine) and aneasthetists to provide pain relief in situations from childbirth to osteoarthritis.
 

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Jennifer (RRT18114)  ·  04 Oct 2004
Hi all, I am the original poster, I have went to the dermatologist and he prescribed, as someone else said something to strong, but it worked! It's Fluocinonide Ointment 0.05%. My daughter is 90% cleared from her eczema. I also took her to an allergist and I found out she is allergic to eggs. I wanted to thank you all for letting me know your views and suggestions. William, thank you for all of your thoughts and concerns. I had not heard much but homeopathy before this but after reading everything you have wrote and doing my own resource about it I know it's something I'm not interested in. Thanks again all.
 

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Anonymous  ·  04 Oct 2004
The placebo effect is a psychological effect where when individuals were given simple sugar tablets instead of the active drug they reported improved well being and reduction of symptoms. I hasten to add that most trials now ethically must use the next best drug on the market so these effects are not seen so much anymore. As for the power of positive thinking there was another trial of cancer patients who had people pray for them while they were ill and the showed a statistically significant improvement compared to those patients who were not prayed for. I dont think that it is ethically ok to lie to people but as a scientist I also know that there are many things we cannot explain. I will confess that I have seen little actual evidence for the effect of these treatments but if I dismissed everything straight off then I wouldnt be in the profession I am today. I would urge people to be cautious however and only ever use alternative medicine in agreement with your GP. Certain homeopathic remedies can interfere with certain treatments, esp with respect to chemotherapy
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  04 Oct 2004
Most CAM does not help people. You just *said* it did. Homeopathy cannot cure you as it’s only water, *by law*. Reiki is no different than the Ju Ju carried out by witchdoctors. There is a very long explanation of this that I will try and explain as briefly as possible. I have just finished a book by James Randi (he speaks at the RDS Wed night) on his exposure of “Faith Healing” fraud in the USA in the 80’s and the same tricks and beliefs are at play in all Alternative Medicine. People who “want to be healed” or “want to believe” are the subjects. The healer uses tricks to make them feel they are being healed. He takes them into his confidence by wearing a white coat, calling his work “therapy” agreeing with their illogical beliefs, (e.g. medicine is poison, they need detoxing, their energy is unbalanced etc.), talking calmly, listening to them ramble on, fills his walls with important looking charts etc. The tricks are numerous but here’s some examples from Randi’s book. The healer went to a person in the audience in a wheelchair and touched their forehead and announced that they were healed. He then asked them to stand up. Miraculously they did. In some cases the healer hops into the chair and gets the patient to push him up the isle. What actually happened was the patient arrived walking and was put in the wheelchair by the healer’s helpers. One healer had a truck with 30 wheelchairs that followed him around when he preached. Needless to say when the audience saw this “miracle” they handed over money to support “Jesus”. Some of these guys raked in millions PER MONTH. Randi interviewed these “healed” people and they admitted they could walk beforehand but believed in the healer so said nothing. One healer claimed that “The Holy Spirit” gave him the Gift of Knowledge that allowed him to know who the people were in the audience and what their complaint was but Randi discovered that he had a receiver in his ear and actually recorded four and a half hours worth of transmissions of the healer's wife feeding him the info that had been collected by his assistants from people entering the show. The TV had a program last week about a Russian girl that could diagnose illness by seeing inside people’s bodies. She used similar tricks, calling out loads of complaints until she got one right and then the “patient” only remembered the one that was correct and forgot all the wrong answers. Most amazing was the fact that in one case she got 1 right out of 6 yet 5 out the 6 said she was wonderful and helped them. People are VERY gullible. Some CAM treatments have calming side effects and there are psychological effects at play. But these effects can be implemented in “mainstream” medicine. For example, many CAM “practitioners” spend a lot of time listening to people who in many cases just need someone to talk to. I suspect many are simply hypochondriacs. A condition exacerbated by constant advertising that fuels the notion that we need more “energy”, tablets to help “those over 50”, “detox-ing”, “vitamins to ward of the ‘flu”, “energy-balancing” etc. I have no doubt that many people think they are ill when they are not. A better diet, more exercise and less alcohol would work wonders. The Massage therapies do help people in the same way as massage does, but then one should attend a Masseur and not say a Reflexologist(?) who in many cases is not even trained in Massage. There is some justification in paying a doctor €40 as he has spent 10 years training but someone that has just completed a correspondence course on magic? Let’s say I set up a “clinic” to help overweight people lose weight. I concoct a fake potion that is useless but I put the clinic on top of a long steep hill with no public transport, no proper roads and therefore the patients have to walk several miles uphill to buy the snake oil for €50 a pop (about what many CAM artists seem to charge). I then only sell 3 days supply and insist that they return every 3 days to buy another 2 days supply. Anyone attending my clinic over several weeks will start to lose weigh and get fit from all the up hill walking. Is this acceptable? Is it right that I should be allowed to charge €50 for the snake oil? I am actually selling them a useless remedy but there is a side effect that works. Would they not be better off simply getting exercise and paying nothing? The fact that Chinese “medicine” has been around for years is irrelevant for many reasons. Much of the quackery in the west just uses the notion of Chinese medicine to give it some respect. Do you really think people living 5,000 year ago where so advanced that they discovered treatments that modern medical science is still not aware of? How daft, these people thought the Earth was flat. The ancient Chinese thought the Earth came from an egg. Acupuncture is more nonsense. There are NO “energy channels” in the body into which pins can be stuck. The ancient people of China and Japan had a life expectancy a fraction of ours and they had very high infant mortality, so no they didn’t survive very well on their magic potions and treatments. I am against CAM because it is fraud and often dangerous. Simple.
 

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Anonymous  ·  04 Oct 2004
Tell us William, why are you so agressively against (not to mention insulting towards) anything outside of conventional medecine which helps people. If people are helped by these methods why are you so dismissive and 'anti' their use.
And for your information 'a reputable Reiki centre' is one whcih has a good reputation.
Whether you agree wit it or noT, Chinese herbal medicine has a 5,000 year history of use in Asia - long before modern medicine was in use here, and the citizens of China and much of Japan where it was also used, seem to have survived very well.
 

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Anonymous  ·  01 Oct 2004
Thank you William you have been very insightful.
 

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William (williamgrogan)  ·  01 Oct 2004
I am trying to help the mother, and anyone else who is reading this, by trying to ensure she is not conned out of her money and worse still stops medication and replaces it with magic potions. The Dept of Health, the medical profession and the police don’t like to feud either and as result hundreds of millions of Euros are being defrauded from people in Ireland every year. The case of the recently struck off doctors in Clare, the Noni Juice, Roisin on Joe Duffy this week and the rest of them are only the tip of the iceberg. I know this. Are you suggesting I too don’t bother feuding and the fraud continues? Have you noticed that neither you nor anyone else on this thread has actually contradicted any fact I have put forward? Odd isn’t it? I’m not arguing “that this is better than that”. I am saying that magic does not work. Be wary of putting too much emphasis on allergies as the source of everything. Much of the testing for allergies, especially that done by non-medically qualified people, is also quackery. I would be fairly confident that the advice of a specialist doctor is as good as she will get. There is nothing wrong with getting a second medical opinion. Medical “recommendations” from people on the web, in the pub, in the hairdressers etc. are almost certainly completely useless in comparison to that from a specialist (as is legal advice etc.). It’s a pity Anon 13:10 didn’t explain the Placebo effect more fully as many people think this is actually HOW homeopathy works. Your point has some merit BUT the vast majority of people that go to CAM artists do not actually get better AS A RESULT of their treatment, they either get worse, stay the same, heal naturally (in mean in due course) or THINK they are getting better when they are not. There is very little evidence that “the mind” can cure anything. In fact a recent study on cancer patients showed that a positive outlook did nothing to increase survival rates. Those clinical trials you refer to often are for treating subjective conditions such as pain. More people than not will THINK they have less pain if you give them a tablet. Are you suggesting that it is ethically OK to lie to people and take their money under false pretences so that they are fooled into thinking that they are getting better? Come on. Justify that. Remember what CON ARTIST means, Confidence Trickster. In other words they fool people into parting with their money by taking them into their confidence and getting them to believe a load of baloney. Reading these posts and many others they succeed magnificently. Even fooling people who should have more sense. Can I ask both those who claim a Science background, do you think Homeopathy or Reiki can ACTUALLY heal someone?
 

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Anonymous  ·  01 Oct 2004
I am an immunologist with a masters in science and i would just like to point out that it does not matter whether anyone can prove that homeopathy or alternative medicines work, what matters is the they induce a placebo effect in people who use them. This basically means that because they believe in the therapy and feel that they are actually doing something to fight their condition it has a positive effect. The same happens in clinical trials where patients who are not taking the active drug report that they are feeling better even though they have no been treated. The mind is a powerful tool!
 

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Anonymous  ·  30 Sep 2004
William this is suppose to help the mother not feud whether one is better then the other. How about letting others give ideas to help the mother rather then arguing everything someone else tries to say? I am sure the mother read what it is you said the first time and doesn't care to read about any more nonsense of this is better then this or that is better then that. How about suggesting what kind of lotion best helped you or perhaps giving some other useful tips to help the mother. Arguing over what other people write is not helping her get any ideas on how to help her daughter. I am sure you will come back with something to say about what I have written, but then again you are the only one getting worked up about it.
To the mother… try taking your child to an allergist to see what it is that she is allergic to. Most children with eczema are allergic to dairy, wheat, peanuts, eggs or even nickel. Once you find out it’ll be easier to go from there. Try short baths and moisturizers as often as possible. Don’t wrap the skin up because it needs air; keep loose clothing on your child. The dermatologist will be able to provide the latest of medication however your pediatrician has been there since the child was a baby and knows your child better then a new doctor can. I have found in my case the dermatologist was very helpful but less caring for my child. He prescribed something that was way to strong for my child’s age and weight just to get the job done but did not take into consideration the strong side effects that my child would have from the prescription. My suggestion is to stay with your family doctor and see an allergist.
 

1,325 Posts

William (williamgrogan)  ·  30 Sep 2004
So Ciaral has a science degree and has seen some science programs on why Homeopathy CANNOT work? Funny, she (he?) doesn’t actually say whether she agrees that it CANNOT work only that “it worked for me/my friends”. One of the bedrocks of the Scientific Method is objective analysis but Ciaral throws all this out by implying that the objective evidence says it CANNOT work but her own and her friends subjective experiences tell her it does. I’ll be blunt; I don’t think Ciaral was paying attention in science basics class. We know why people THINK Homeopathy works, that doesn’t prove it does. Think! It does not matter if someone recommends someone who does something that cannot help you, that doesn’t suddenly change the laws of physics and chemistry. In fact people’s misunderstanding of what is going on when they are being conned is what leads them to think that they were “helped” by the CAM Artist and results in them “recommending” them. “Open-minded” is a much abused cliché. Claiming to believe in witchcraft (which is what Reiki is) on the basis that you are “open-minded” does not prove witchcraft. As someone said, “don’t be so open-minded that your brain falls out”. Here is a link that discusses Homeopathy and the experiences of someone who claims to be rational and scientifically literate http://skepdic.com/homeo.html I have asked a few simple questions about Homeopathy and put forward some major contradictions in its theory and practice, maybe Ciaral would answer them using the benefits of her scientific training?
 

27 Posts

ciaral  ·  30 Sep 2004
I cannot comment on Reiki, but acupuncture & homeopathy have given good results for me & many people I know, when general practicioners have been stumped!
 
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