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(Saturday, 29th Nov, 2014)

Hysterectomy

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0 Posts

SamSam  ·  21 Aug 2009

Hysterectomy is the removal of your uterus due to certain kinds of problems existed. I don't think it can lower down the sexual sensation of the person who undergone the surgery. Loss of sexual stimulation can be hormonal, meaning of your experiencing menopause right know then it could be possible. Another factor is medication, if you are taking medication try to find out if it alters the function of your hormones that may affect sexual stimulation. lastly, you should also consider the fact that you are partly disable due to the procedure. You should also consider the after effect of it like scars due to surgery. Trust me it matters.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  11 Jun 2009

Also Kiwi, consent is legally required for every elective procedure (and some non-elective ones) for every patient over 16 who is compis mentis (i.e. where they are not judged to be of unsound mind or incapable of making decisions - as for example a profoundly intellectually disabled person would be or a person with advanced dimentia) which is the vast majority of us.For example, when I was having an IUS inserted, my gyne, told me that the risks inclued uterine perforation, bleeding severe enough to require hospital transfer and rapid drop in heart rate. She also told me she had, in 30 years of clinical practice never had either of the first two happen and the the third was rare. As it happens I did suffer rapid drop in heart rate (down to 29!) and it does happpen 1 on 10,000 women.

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  10 Jun 2009

Since my hysterectomy I have had three surgeries. One for the ureter tub, two others to help with the pain I am in. I am expecting one more surgery. I would have gone through as many surgeries as needed to keep my uterus. If I need more surgeries to get ride of the fibroids I would choice this then what I have now.

To purple, You could check into a diet that hopefully help you. I don’t know if you have health food stores where you are, but I go there and ask them what would be good for your condition. They might also have a diet book. That you know what kind of food helps or makes your condition worse. They might have some suggestions. Sorry I don’t have anything else to help you with.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  09 Jun 2009

Hi Kiwi, I never heard that the cervix is cut in half and re-sewn? I can't see how there'd be any surgical need for this. Thre are certain advanced prolapses for whichmethids of repiar have been tied and are uncucessful, this is where a hysterectomy, of last resort, is useful. For some, women,m if myenectomy is suitablr, it means goin through surgery after surgery as it may need to repeated again and again as new ones from or re-grow. For some women repeated surgeries carry onmore risk than one surgery involving hysterectomy, Of course it depends on the woman.

 

1,374 Posts

purple  ·  09 Jun 2009

hi all

i have written many letter to this post, and got a lot of advice, i have had a hysterctomy 10 years now, i was with my GP on friday as i had a terrible thrush infection, i told him about the hot flushes and moods and everything my body is going through, he said my body was going through mranpause slow, not many woman go through this slow they go the ful wack, im so so low i cant help it, the last few days iv been moody, crying too, my hubby has been trying to help but i have been pushing him away, cant go on HRT as im on bloodpressure meds. advice please,

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  09 Jun 2009

You said “In a sub-total hysterectomy the cervix is not removed and so the vagina will not be sewn into a closed pocket at the top but this of course depends on the individual woman’s' condition.”  I heard that the cervix is cut in half then resewn together from a vaginal hysterectomy.  I believe a myomectomy is the answer and the doctor can do prolapse repair without removing the uterus. 

 

 You said “legally required for informed consent,”  Can you please explain what exactly you mean by this?  I was not told there could be complication to the surgery like the bladder, or possible back pain.  I was not told the vagina would be sewn into a pocket.  I was not told about the Sacrospinous ligament fixation repair it is not on my consent form.  So what exactly is informed consent?  Can you please explain this to me?  I have seen many physicians and ask them question and they don’t want to tell me.  I had vaginal repairs that cause me pain.  I was told by one doctor they can’t fix this.  So I no longer enjoy intercourse.  How can I get my answers if I can’t find a doctor to explain to me what was done?  The surgeon never came after surgery to explain.  At the post-op check up I took my sister with me and the doctor refused to have her in the room with me.  I had asked her about the pain and the doctor told me my pain is not from surgery to see another doctor.  So that is where I am today.  I can’t find an attorney to help me.  One attorney told me it was neglect but they give me no help.  How do I find an honest doctor?  To find my answers I look on the internet and medical libraries.  If you have any suggestion I will be glad to hear them. The number again is 1-610-667-7757 this number in the United States, sorry about that.  I have had some help here which I am grateful for.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  09 Jun 2009

Hi Jeni, dispite what Kiwi says I can tell you that of the women I know who had hysterectomies (carefully considered medically neccessary hysterectomies) only one had any pain after recovery and this was becuase she needed an additionmal procedure which was performed and resolved the problem. And it wasn't back pain in her case. I haven't heard of anyone, even anecdotally, even when the procedure was more common due to lack of alternatives, who had back pain so severe following recovery that no oyher treatment was possible and they needed injections. Yes hysterectomy is major surgery and like any major surgery should not be taken likely or without good medical reason and recovery will take time and patience but I think you would be wise to take on board the positives from people who have had successful surgery as well as the negatives about the possible risks and side effects. In a sub-total hystectomy the cervix is not removed and so the vagina will not be sewn into a closed pocket at the top but this of course depedns on the individual womans' condition. The ovaries provide the majority of sex hormones for women so as long as these are not removed (and this is not done routinely here) then there should be no need for hormone replacement therapy.I see what you're saying kiwi about ones sex life being affected but how possible do you think it is to have a satisfying sex life when a women is heamorhaging for several weeks a month, has acute prolapse and is in pain for the rest of the time. The answer - practically impossible and in addition to that the quality oif life in other areas will be very very poor. For this reason many women report an improved sex life after surgery. As regards surgeons and gynecological consultants - Yes, they do provide information, as is legally required for informed consent, as to whether the cervis will be removed and the repair surgery involved for the ligaments. If you were lied to by your surgeon that is medical misconduct and totally unprofessional and clearly the fault lies with the consultant rather than the surgery - especially givne that your bladder as permanently damaged. You are entitled to be angry if you were refused a second opinion - a second opinion (or a third or fourth for that matter) to which we are all medically entitled. You are fully entitled to keep asking questions until you get the answers you are satisfied with - as regards any surgery or procedure. With regard to the number 667-7757, which area code is this? As 610 is not a valid area code for Ireland? Is this a UK numer? In which case from here it will need +44 in front of it. Just to save any confusion.

 

51 Posts

pet  ·  08 Jun 2009

Kiwi

My heart goes out to you having gone through so much and I can only hope that things do get better for you in the near future. I was one of the lucky ones that I suffered no setbacks after operation and feel really good. Have you tried Bio Feedback ? they manage pain but most importantly can see what muscles are in spasms or knotted and may be able to give you some relief. You are linked up to a computer and it deals with breathing techniques etc My young niece who has rap similar to ibs in adults is attending and so far doing very good and not on any medication..It may be worth a shot., Dont give up hope and again I'm so sorry for what you are going through. x


Pet

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  08 Jun 2009

Jeni, I am sorry to tell you this but most likely you won’t be pain free. When the uterus is taken out they cut the nerves that go to your back. At first my back didn’t hurt until a year and a half later. They can’t fix the pain; only give you shot to numb the pain. Your vagina will be sewn into a closed pocket and dislocated. Did your doctor tell you that the vagina will be sewn into a pocket or closed at the top? Mine didn’t. When just the uterus is taken out you loose around 65% of your hormones. That usually affects your libido. Since you loose some of your hormones you have a 3 times greater risk of heart problem. Your cervix helps support your bladder and bowels. Your can have a greater risk of incontinence. I have incontinence, plus two permanent conditions with the bladder from the surgery. If you have had a vaginal orgasm you will never have it again. The uterus gives you a better climax. It is medically impossible to have a vaginal orgasm after the surgery. I could go on. If you don’t believe me and believe the doctor like most people do. Please look up these things and see for your self. You can also go to a medical library and ask the librarian for help. Look up that the uterus is a sex organ. Please I am not hear just because I want to be. I am hear to help women so they are not deceived by there doctor. I am trying to tell you the truth that doctor won’t. I was lied to and yes I am angry because I had other choices that the doctor didn’t give me. The doctor I had: had the skill to do a myomectomy but I was not offered it. I was not offered any other alternate. Please you could call this number and ask for a counselor. The counselor will help give you all your options. Then you can decide what to do. Please listen to what she has to say it can’t hurt to be knowledgable. (610) 667-7757

 

5 Posts

jeni  ·  07 Jun 2009

Thank you all so much for your comments.  I am starting to feel better about the situation.  I have a wonderful supportive family behind me and when I am pain free I am planning to do all the things that this stopped me from doing.  I am glad that I can see a light at the end of a very long and painful time.  As for Kiwi, i appreciate your comments but I rather be pain free and have a life with my daughter and do things than be like so tired, in pain and missing out on so much of her life.  I was given a great gift of a child and for that I will be forever grateful. 

Thank you all for your kind words.

Jeni

 

25 Posts

tmb  ·  04 Jun 2009

Jenni.....I used to post here but don't anymore because of the type of rubbish kiwi posts.

I had a hysterectomy 8 weeks ago for fibriods,like you I tried everything all went well and it's the best thing I ever did.

PLease don't listen to the negative posts on here.

Best of luck to you.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  04 Jun 2009

Hi Tinkerbell, glad the surgery worked out so well for you. For any other wokmen readign this who had the same problenms as yoyu,k it might be worth considering, if the mirena IUD does not work to reduce the bleeding that endometrila balation might be an option to consider. It is is far less invasive preserves your womb and has a quicker recovery time.Hi Jeni, depending on the type of hysterectomy perfomed I would say 3 months is the average recovery time to return to work - unless your job is very active in whichn case it might take longer. Aas for painkillers, as long as you have pain would be the simple answer but probably a couple of weeks.Kiwi - Asprin causes death - FACT. Does that mean it kills everyone who takes it - No.The pill has a very long list of contraindications - including fatal clots - should we all stop taking it - No.I am all for all patinets being fully informed as to every surgery procedure and medication but some of the side effects you mention are rare in the extreme and some are short term. For other side effects it is a case of weighing them up against the suffering and appalling quality of life a women may be suffering, for years maybe, as a result of problems with her womb. For a woman going thru medical menopuase , who has not had a hysterectomy due to hormone responsive cancer, HRT IS a suitable option. The medical term for the removal of the ovaries is oophorectomy  - which NOT done - either with or without hysterectomy without very good medical reason. Those statistics are WRONG - and NOT THE CASE in the current Irish context at all. Please get your facts right before you go scare mongering. You have already been told serveral times that money NOT A FACTOR WHATSOEVER in the Irish public hospital context.

 

51 Posts

pet  ·  03 Jun 2009

Jeni

It took me four weeks to start driving again after my operation and I felt great after about two days. Yes you're sore but not in pain.(you get plenty of pain relief) It depends which type of operation you have I had the abdominal one (cut down the middle) scar cleared very quickly and is very neat you'd hardly notice it. Sex life actually improves and contary to what they say it doesn't hurt first time. They say return to work approx 6/8 weeks but it depends on individual as we all take different time to heal. Best of luck and you'll come out the other side fine..Dont listen to Kiwi777 ..We know she's only trying to give facts but when you have to go through something like hysterectomy you dont need to hear facts...Think positive and you'll be fine...I found the website for Mayo Clinic usa very good to find out about the operation and they go through everything..your partner may like to have a look and is a lot that maybe he cant talk to anyone about..Stick together and talk and you'll both be fine!! xxx


Pet

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  03 Jun 2009

Facts About Hysterectomy

FACT: Women experience a loss of physical sexual sensation as a result of hysterectomy.FACT: A woman's vagina is shortened, scarred and dislocated by hysterectomy. FACT: Hysterectomy's damage is life-long. Among its most common consequences, in addition to operative injuries are:


  • heart disease

  • osteoporosis

  • bone, joint and muscle pain and immobility

  • loss of sexual desire, arousal, sensation

  • painful intercourse, vaginal damage

  • displacement of bladder, bowel, and other pelvic organs

  • urinary tract infections, frequency, incontinence

  • chronic constipation and digestive disorders

  • profound fatigue

  • chronic exhaustion

  • altered body odor

  • loss of short-term memory

  • blunting of emotions, personality changes, despondency, irritability, anger, reclusiveness and suicidal thinking


FACT: No drugs or other treatments can replace ovarian or uterine hormones or functions. The loss is permanent. FACT: The medical term for the removal of the ovaries is castration. 76% of women are castrated at the same time of the hysterectomy.FACT: The uterus and ovaries function throughout life in women who have not been hysterectomized or castrated. FACT: 98% of women HERS has referred to board-certified gynecologists after being told they needed hysterectomies, discovered that, in fact, they did not need hysterectomies.FACT: Gynecologists, hospitals and drug companies make more than 8 billion dollars a year from the business of hysterectomy and castration. HERS is the only independent, international organization dedicated to the issue of hysterectomy and advocates for fully informed medical choices by women.

If you don't believe what this says then take the information and look it up for your self and you will see the truth. Please you need your uterus for the rest of your life. I have had a hysterectomy and three other surgery after wards to see what is wrong and I am still in pain. So you might need more than one surgery but it is worth it. Please keep your uterus. Don't let the doctor talk you into it. There are other options. You can call hear to find out what options you do have and what is best for you. (610) 667-7757 , and all the consequences to surgery, that your doctor won't tell you.

 

5 Posts

jeni  ·  02 Jun 2009

Hi

Just read ticklebells message and it is a great relief. I have been suffering with fibroids and had repeated surgeries to remove them.  I was told last week that the best and only option for me is a hysterectomy.. As you can imagine I was a bit shocked as I am only 35.... but I am glad to hear that life goes on..  I am taking tablets to stop my bleeding and for pain. 

I was reading some information on hysterectomies, which can be confusing.  Can someone answer me how long does it take to recover/return to work? How long do I need to be on painkillers? If anyone has a good website for information so my partner could understand whats going on? 

Thanks

Jeni

 

2 Posts

Tinkerbell67  ·  30 May 2009

Hi All,

When i was growing up in Dublin you would hear mothers talking about so and so not being well......you know with 'womens problems' so reality was that a lot of younger women were not really aware of the options.

I had been suffering really badly with bleeding, large clots, pain etc which could not be controlled. I took every type of medication/contraception to try and over come these symptoms. Eventually my doctor referred me to a consultant in Dublin. Although my GP had mentioned that a hysterectomy was probably the only option I was a bit shocked that the consultant had recommended it - as I was only 38. He advised me to take my time and give due consideration to it..really I didnt need time to consider it, I really needed to be able to function in daily life and at that stage I was at my wits end.

I had the hysterectomy in 2007 and it was the best advice I had been given throughout the years of going from doctor to doctor - It was the best decision I made. Yes it was sore after the op but not much sorer than giving birth. Within a couple of weeks I felt the benefits - the constant tiredness had disappeared I had more energy and most importantly it lifted my spirits.

If I had of had the option of this operation years ago I would have taken it. It transformed my life and has given me a much better quality of life for myself and my family. The years I wasted going around suffering in silence, it is my recommendation to any woman if you are finished having your family and you are suffering - go and look at the possibility of the operation it has certainly changed my life.

Tinkerbell67

 

11 Posts

Patty1971  ·  29 May 2009

Hi Tashra,

Its nice to hear from you too.. Wow I cant believe its been 13 weeks since your OP. Thanks for letting me know about the other web site. I will try and log on to see if we can continue getting positive feedback and most of all the support that we all need after going through what we went through. However, its been 16 weeks since I had my OP and I cant believe how happy I am that I went through this surgery. I guess it pays to take care of yourself during those first few months in order to have a successful outcome. Take care and God Bless..

Patty :)

 

14 Posts

tashra  ·  28 May 2009

Hi Patti, am so glad to hear you are doing well and well on the road to recovery :-D. I am doing absoultly fantastic, i really would never belive that i had an op 13 weeks ago. I too am no longer posting on hear either as i feel this has become an extremly negative place, like you and TMB have also said, very sad really. I do go to another site which is fab and has loads of positive advice if you feel you wanna check it out at all it's hysterectomy-association.org. I told TMB about it too. Take care Patti, best wishes for you future fab life

xxx

 

11 Posts

Patty1971  ·  28 May 2009

Dear TMB,

Thank you for writing back and I wish you the best and I hope you have a wonderful day.. And again thank you for the continued support.

Patty

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  28 May 2009

To noddy,

I have had a hysterectomy and wish I didn’t. I am glad you and your wife are going to wait before you decide about what to do about your problem. This gives you time to figure things out. I thought I would share what I have learned in hopes this will help you. Since my surgery I have been in constant pain and have bladder problems. I have found a wonderful web site called the Hysterectomy Alternatives and Aftereffects: Hers Foundation. There is a lot of information about hysterectomies and alternatives. Is what I did was called them up for counseling and I received a lot of help and information. The counselor can tell you all your options and which one is the best for your condition. The counselor here has helped me with my decisions and how to proceed in getting help for my pain. I can’t thank her enough for all her help. Knowledge and truth is half the battle. They also have referrals for evaluation and treatment. There isn’t any other place that I have found that has helped me as much as the Hersfoundation. You can call them at (610) 667-7757 and ask to talk with someone. I feel it can’t hurt to get as much information as possible before any type of surgery.

 

1,374 Posts

purple  ·  27 May 2009

hi all

i was in my late 30s when i had my big op, i was sad to have it as i wanted to try for another baby. but was told no that my womb was too enlarged,. i went into a deep depression after my op, i cried for weeks, my GP told me that i was suffering from depression but i didnt want to no, but after a while i realised i was going through a depression.today im going through slow prosses of menopause as im in my early 40s.

 

25 Posts

tmb  ·  27 May 2009

Patti ...I am so glad you are doing well.I'm not posting here any longer for the same reasons as you but was popping in now and again to check if you'd been on.

It's great that the three of us are doing well and sad that this site went downhill.

Thankyou so much for your support and good wishes before and after my op.

Take care of yourself Smile

 

11 Posts

Patty1971  ·  27 May 2009

For Tashra and TMB,

I just wanted to let you know that I am doing so well and I am back to my normal life again. I have had no complications and I feel better than ever. It's a shame that this site has so many negative responses and that is the reason why I stopped reading and replying to anyone other than the two of you.

Take care and I am so glad to hear that you are also on the path to a full recovery. Hope you have a wonderful day and thank you for asking about my status after my Op. Your postive feedback and support sure helped me get through it.

God Bless you,

Patty :)

 

8 Posts

noddy  ·  25 May 2009

Hello, my wife was diagnosed with a fibroid, given all the info., and on the consultants advice decided to wait a while to see if it began to press on bladder etc. Hysterectomy may be needed down the line. Get all the information you can.        Keep well, Noddy.

 

51 Posts

pet  ·  22 May 2009

Hi Anon

The injection was a nightmare and by the end of it I was ready to let them do anything. It shrank my cervix and as a result it started to 'hang down'. At the time the Neary investigation was all over the papers and I could have done with more time. The downside is if I had waited there was a danger all organs would start to grow together .. I'm glad it's over and done with, no more periods but I do ovulate...not much use. The way I look at it I was 43 when they found it and its done and dusted..I never suffered period pain or pain except for nagging ache which I put down to one of those things..I feel fine and now look forward to the natural 'menopause' only joking!! If you're not happy with anything keep asking , you have to be confident with the surgeon you select, I was one of the lucky ones- he was a gentleman.


Pet

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  22 May 2009

Tashra and TMB, as you have been through the surgery and have great advice and support for other members it would be a shame to see you essentially bullied off the discussion. 

ALL surgery carries risk and injury is one of them but as I have siad, and I am repeatin myself now - it is a case of weihing up the risk and also seeing what is likely to be more damagigng to the patienbt - the risk during hysterectomy or the damage, truama and sheer misery or allowing a woman to continue a life of severe suffering where she has low or no quality of life compared with the benefits that curing her condition thru surgery could offer.Tashra is a prime example of this. I don't knwo of any doctor who would nmake major surgery, involving organ removal, sound like a simply procedure. Any surgeon attempting to do that is treating the patient as if they are of very limited intelligence wich to be honest is insulting to the vast majoritry of adult women. Thank you for the explanation of the surgery, this I think is very helpful and somehting that all womenb should be aware of - no matter how swuemish they may feel. However it is completely WRONG to say that removing the ovaries is done as part of a hysterectomy, This is simply NOT THE CASE HERE. Oophorectomy is done with hysterectomy (and sometime on its own) IF medical conditions neccessitate it. Let me give you another, maybe not as medically detialed explanationof what could be considered a simple procedure. It can be done under general aneasthetic or when the patient Is awake., It's an IUS ihsertion. A substance is applied locally to the cervix causing it artifically dilate, a narrow tube is inseted causig further dilation, cramping and pain. Through this tube, the IUS is passed and posotioned in the womb. This can cuase severe cramping, contractions (like the ones you would experience in labour), witha risk of uterine perforations and scarring and also can induce a dramatic drop inb blood pressure causing the woman to pass out. Once inserted it causes irritation to the womb, likely to cuase bleeding for up to 6 weeks and increases the risk of PID.

Does this mean it should be abandoned as a practice? Of course not.Nor does it mean that it is not the best form of contraceptive for some women - it most emphatically is.But also its success does not mean that is for every woman or that women should not be carefully screened beforehand for suitability.

Tashra, of course what has been said is massively offending - not only that but it is massively innacurate.

 

25 Posts

tmb  ·  22 May 2009

I second Tashra on that one..I have explained all I can about my hysterectomy and reasons for it and certain people refuse to listen/accept what they read  and just keep dishing out the same old tripe!

Stay on the bandwagon if you want but KEEP ME OUT OF IT!

Thankyou. I will not be posting here again and do not wish to see my name mentioned again.

This site was supposed to be a support..That's a laugh!!

 

14 Posts

tashra  ·  22 May 2009

Can you stop aiming your propaganda and statistics  at me thanks. I am so sorry I ever went on here and really do not wish to be included in any other disscussion, so just aim your info at anyone else that wishes to know it thanks. Just to also say I do hav a friend that i know who had a hysterectomy 20 years ago and is just fine with no problems so you can't just look at statistics and think they are right. YOU KNOW NOTHING ABOUT ME AT ALL.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  22 May 2009

Hi Pet, if you felt the injection was doing its job or even if you felt it needed further time to work then you could have deferred - or even declined surgery. Did he explain why mynectomy wasn't suitable? Yoiu are entitled to that information. However there is not need for ovaries to be removed without good medical reason - becuase of this, there should be no reason why you would experience pre-mature (medical) menopause.Your stats on incontinence do not compare like with like. First of all are they stats for Ireland? And second in order to have a proper comparison you woudl need to compare not between women post-hysterectomy and women who do not have health problems in this regard but between women post hysterectomy and a target group of women with the same problems and degree of problems as the hysterectomy group pre-surgery but who did not opt for surgery . It is only with a study of this nature that it actually bears any relevance.For the record, I am all in favour of information - statistical, surgical, medical and related to personal experience.What I am not in favour of is scare mongering to the degree where women genuinely needing surgery will be put off and also a person's problems post surgery bcoming so all dominating that they seek to convince women who don't actually have problems that the surgery ewas somehow the wrong choice for them as well. This is not helpful.

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  21 May 2009

Dear tashra,

I wish you had read some of this before surgery so you would know the truth and not have a hysterectomy. It looks like you were not informed of everything before your surgery. This is the point of all this negativity. I don’t want to be negative; I just want women to know the truth that doctors do not tell you about this surgery, which I think is horrible. I am glad you are doing well. Sorry but I have more information.

The rate of surgery for urinary incontinence was 2.4-fold higher in women who underwent hysterectomy than among those who did not (regardless of age or hysterectomy technique). The risk for stress–urinary-incontinence surgery was especially high during the initial 5 years after hysterectomy (hazard ratio, 2.7) but persisted at elevated levels for more than 10 years (HR, 2.1). http://womens-health.jwatch.org/cgi/content/full/2007/1101/1 .

Blog. http://www.wdxcyber.com/mutbladdersurg.htm

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  21 May 2009

Yes, Kiwi I am perfectly aware of the Harding Clarke report on Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital - Drogheda (known as he Neary report) thank you - as is every woman (and man) in the entire country. This is not news to anyone and has been common knowledge for a long time. I am also aware of the finding of the report (which is public knowledge and accessible by all), the enquiry and the hearing and that the surgeon was acting completeley in the wrong in almost all cases. There is no medical justification for it and again, it is the surgeoinb who is at fault. As I have already said, completely unprofessionally, negiligently and possibly within the context of grave misconduct when uneccessary surgery is performed. Your previous posts prove my point exactly, women in Europe are perscribed hysterectonmy far less often - clearly in a public (soclaised medcial care ) system this happens far less often but in the U.S. it would appear to happen at a rate we have not seen here in decades. Perhaps medicine in the U.S. is less advanced tho to be honest I would find that extremely difficult to believe (advances and scientific method is more advanced I would have thought). Perhaps because it is a HMO or privately finance based system, money comes into it care more than it would here in a public system.While I am all in favour of preventative medicine, your comment on the Boike report is quite right, removing healthy ovaries from women unlikley to get ovarian cancer and increasing their risk of osteoporoisis and heart disease is an inefficient and as shoddy a practise as removing the breasts of women not carry a gene positive for breast cancer. It is quite simply bad medicine which is why oophorectomy is not done here without good reason - some of which I have mentioned above. Preventative medcine involves (or should involve) testing and scans for the avoidance of cancer and other lifestyle means such as the use of the contraceptive pill and giving up smoking - not the routine removal of healthy organs.

 

51 Posts

pet  ·  20 May 2009

Hi All

I had a very large fibroid, was put on an injection slow release over three months to try shrink it (clinical menopause) When I met gynie doctor he examined me, put me on the injection and booked surgery for three months..Exactly three months on I was on the operating table , had to sign consent form which gave him permission to take what was needed!! Asked about alternatives but this was the best in my case. Surprised he didnt take overies but he said they were healthy! Stupid as I'd already had a taste of menopause for three months and now know what I have to look forward to! Keep asking questions alas some times the answer is still the same..Best of luck


Pet

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  20 May 2009

Kiwi, healthy ovaries are not automatically removed as part od a hysterectomy in Ireland today. In fact unless there is a good reason to do so, such as ovarian cancer which cannot be treated by other methods, severe torsionm or chronic unresolable cysts, this is simply not done by any knowledgeable reputable surgeon at all in Ireland these days.

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  20 May 2009

http://www.socialistdemocracy.org/News&AnalysisIreland/News&AnalysisIreNearyReportPart1.html

Read this article and you will see that this happens in America and in Ireland. These stories are not isolated. You are either deceiving women or you really don’t know any better. 

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  20 May 2009

Fifty percent of American women are prescribed a hysterectomy resulting in 550,000 hysterectomies being performed each year (five times the rate in Europe). Yet many women are unaware of the full range of medical alternatives and the long-term consequences.

Boike et al. have estimated that in the year 2005 approximately 854,000 hysterectomies will be performed in the United States. Approximately 4,000 of the women who undergo removal of both ovaries at the time of hysterectomy will avoid the ravages of ovarian cancer. Boike suggests that if all women over age 40 who undergo hysterectomy have their ovaries routinely removed, 2,200 additional women may avoid subsequent development of ovarian cancer. The routine castration of all women who undergo hysterectomy at age 40 is laudable in its attempt to avoid ovarian cancer in the future, but it remains a highly inefficient approach to reduce the risks of developing the disease. Removing 1.7 million ovaries to avoid 2,200 malignancies is highly inefficient, as 99.75% of the castrated women are unlikely to develop ovarian cancer.

 

14 Posts

tashra  ·  20 May 2009

Just wanted to say that i second what TMB had to say and am so glad i never read any of this before i had my op. Yes i did state my reasons for having my op further back in the replies and really am not going to continue to repeat it just to justify a one sided argument which really has totaly hijacked a forum which is supposed to be here to help women who may be facing this op. I too find it MASSISVELY offending to assume that I may be not a full woman now and not be able to function sexually, well that is so not the case thanks very much-I am miles better in every department have had no complications and also had a fantastic surgeon who did a brillant job, no bladder or bowel problems and now 12 weeks on i am now living a life which i sholuld have had previously instead of living the hell that i had done previously for many many years and of which my wonderful family had to support me through too which at times was never easy.

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  20 May 2009

Before research papers began revealing many negative effects of such practice, healthy ovaries were routinely removed at hysterectomy in North America in the 70s and 80s. Today, research available through a simple Medline search leads me to seriously question the rationality and ethical propriety (in the post-forty- year old woman) of routinely removing healthy ovaries during a hysterectomy in the 99.9% of cases with a less than 1% risk of ovarian cancer. 

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  20 May 2009

there is no type of hysterectomy that doesn't cause considerable damage to a woman's body. Although they try to make it sound like a simple procedure, this is what they are not telling you: A hysterectomy is performed by transecting (to cut across; dissect transversely) the round ligaments, incising (to cut into) the anterior leaf of the broad ligament along the bladder, dissecting (to cut apart) the bladder off the lower uterine segment (displacing the bladder from its natural position and causing injury), severing the uterine arteries, transecting the uterosacral ligaments and cardinal ligaments, amputating the uterus and cervix, sewing up the vagina into a closed pocket (shortening the vagina), leaving said ligaments hanging in a women's pelvic cavity (compromising pelvic support), leaving an empty hole for the bowel to shift down into (displacing the natural position of the bowel), severing all the nerves from the genital area to the internal sex organs and spine, and amputating ovaries which causes increased risk for heart attacks, osteoporosis, dementia, etc., and which causes sexual dysfunction. It doesn't matter how you cut into a woman, the damage is the same.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  20 May 2009

Kiwi, I think that TMB answered that VERY clearly in her post. Perhaps yu have not seen it yet. CDastration is a verterinary ternm over here and refers to the removal of all sexula otrgans of a usually male animal - not a woman. Gelding refers to a horse., Spaying and neutering refers to dogs and cats , orcidectomy refers to the surgical removal of the testes - usually in cases such as testicular cancer. oophorectomy is the removal of the ovarines, again for such seriuous conditions as cancer. If a docogtr does not explainthe risk HE is at fualt not the surgery and furthernmore is acting in a most unprofessional matter. However you have absolutely no basis for saying that all doctors in Ireland are acting unprofessionally unless you were a patient of all of them. You really are contradicting yourself. The female sexual organs consist of the vagina, cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes,  ovaries and breasts. Unless a women has for some tragic reason, all of those removed then she could not be described as sexless. Aas far as I understand TMB and Tshra did not have cancer., They neversaid they did to my knowledge and noe did they have all of those oragns removed. So your poinbt is entirely moot in this circumstrancs. I am not " getting " anything. I have always understood it and never stated otherwise. As for most doctors blindly promoting hysterectomies here in this day and age, I certainly don't see what evidence you have of that but as you say, of any doctors who are - they are unprofessional, doing a disservice rather than a service and are possibily gulity of negligence or misconduct. If a consulktant refers you to another specilaist for an alternative, who would s/he and 8 other referrals say the same thing and dismiss the alternative for which the patient had been referred?? I am not sure where you are but here, referrral by one specialist to another for a procedure which the first cannot confidentally perform or is not skilled in, is routine and done on a regular basis all over the country. A person need only have experience as a patient in several specialities to know that - without ever working the field at all

As I said before, all surgey carries risk so it is a case of weighing up the pros and cons. Like a cost benefit analysis between the patient continuing to suffer vs being healed vs the risks carried.

 

19 Posts

kiwi777  ·  19 May 2009

Anonymous You mentioned that Taskra and TBH have exhausted every option prior to hysterectomy how do you know that they were informed of all the option? I do believe doctors do keep women in the dark unless they were told all the options. Taking the ovaries is castration. Castration (also referred to as: gelding, spaying, neutering, fixing, orchiectomy, oophorectomy, and orchidectomy) is any action, surgical, chemical, or otherwise, by which a male loses the functions of the testes or a female loses the functions of the ovaries. The term is more commonly applied to males.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castration I have had four surgery and all of them did not explain all the risks. To me all doctors are acting unprofessionally and possible negligently. You said Aas for having ones sexulity taken away, not only is this incorrect it is frankly bordering on insulting. “The internal female sex organs consist of the vagina, cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. http://www.sexuality-encyclopedia.com/dr-ruth/Female_Sex_Organs “ You are wrong again! If any one of these women had cancer where they given blood test and scans to prove it. If it was cancerous did the doctor also take the limpnodes to make sure they got all the cancer? Your last statement says “be fully informed and seek reliable informed second (or third) opinions. Therefore any doctor who is still blindly promiting it to women - or any surgery is doiugn a disservice to patients. Now you are getting it. Most doctors are blindly promoting hysterectomies. You can see 10 doctors and they will all say the same thing. The doctors who give you all your options and inform you of everything are very, very rare. By your opinion you sound like you might be in the medical field or you trust doctors that they will inform you of everything. The doctor won’t tell you how damaging this surgery really is.

 
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