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(Monday, 28th Jul, 2014)

Prolapsed Womb

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12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  23 Jul 2010

Good advice about the HRT in Spain Roisin,

Sorry, Brigid, I sounded a bit misleading, when I mentioned after the hysterectomy, I meant directly after, but as part of the same procedure - a ind of step 3 or 4, if you know what I mean. 

UNless there is a good Medicla reason, the choice of aneasthetic should be made with the patient, not solely at the doctors convenience. I know plenty of women who had epidural for birth and were fine and I know others who are completley put off by it and pefer general aneasthetic, it depnmds on the person and should be up to the patient to decide unless, as I say, there is a medical reason to go with one or the other. Headache is a common side effect of epidural in soem people but is treatable. The risks are lower with epi but negligible for either in otherwise healthy patients. Bes tof luck with your second or third if you need it, opinion.

 

14 Posts

Roisin  ·  22 Jul 2010

Hi Bridget,   I am over 60 and getting the HRT with some difficulty but the day the Dr. refuses me a prescription'll get them in Spain. As it is I get a supply of my prescriptions in Spain regularly because they are so much cheaper.

Also I would recommend the book "No Change by Wendy Cooper" to anyone thinking of HRT. Once again Good luck.

 

14 Posts

Brigid  ·  22 Jul 2010

Would it not be better to do the keyhole when doing the hysterectomy to attach the ligaments rather than later, I have the prolapse now so it should all be done in one op.  My friend had epidural for knee replacement and was very sick afterwards as was her sister for same op. She also had severe headache all the next day. I had full anesthetic for my gallbladder removal and was not sick at all, I just had a lovely sleep.  I am getting organised to go bac to GP for letter for 2nd opinion.I may even get 3rd opinion, I have choice of Coombe (the master there studied in the US) and St. Vincent's, thanks again for all the info.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  22 Jul 2010

Hi Anonymous, for a repair after hysterectomy, keyhole might be required but the scar is tiny - nothing like a ceserian hysterectomy - but even that is better than organ prolapse of other organs and back pain. Unless there is a very good medical reason for not giving you full aneasethesia, then gthere is no way the surgeon should insist on epidural - unless there are medical criteria for one or the other, it should be YOUR choice of aneasthesia. Did he say WHY he wouldn't dream of doing a caesarian with a full anesthetic - it's your body so you're entitled to know. I would say definitely get a second opinion.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  22 Jul 2010

actually  good ppoint Roisin, I should have mentioned that to you as well. My friend who had the prolapse and surgery I mentioned, was also on HRT and said it made a tremendous difference.

 

14 Posts

Brigid  ·  21 Jul 2010

Hi Anonymous, I can't imagine how the surgeon can reattach the ligaments operating through the vagina, I would imagine he would have to do keyhole combined.  The surgeon I saw said he would just work from the vagina with an epidural.  I have a fear of that also and his answer was he wouldn't dream of doing a caesarian with a full anesthetic (probably spelled that wrong) and so he thought I would be a good candidate for the epidural for a hysterectomy and repair. I am now trying to get the courage to go for the 2nd opinion.

Roisin, I was on HRT tablets for several years, it was great but I got afraid when the scare came out and stopped taking them.  I tried to get on them again but the doctor was against it because of my age, they don't like you to be on them into your sixties!

 

14 Posts

Roisin  ·  21 Jul 2010

Hi Bridget

Good luck to you, I hope all goes well for you. I did have a bowel repair as well, even though I did not know that I needed it. Anyway I'm grand now apart form a few bladder problems but not too much. Also I have been taking HRT since I was in my 40's and I am now over 60, I swear by them. I have a bit of trouble getting the Dr to prescribe them but so far so good.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  21 Jul 2010

Hi Brigid, glad to be of help. Even where a hysterectomy is done for very good medical reason and where all else has failed, there is absolutely NO medical reason - NONE at all for the vaginal vault to collapse bringing the bladder or the bowel down unless the surgeon is lazy, careless or incompetent. Secureing the ligament structure in place to support the bladder and bowel is a requred part of hysterectomy surgery -not some sort of optional extra.

 

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Brigid  ·  20 Jul 2010

Thanks Anonymous and Roisin for your information.  I will see if St. Vincent's Hospital still do gynae. and go from there.  You are right Anonymous the hormones are still active postmenopause in the cervix, uterus and ovaries and add to the well-being of a woman.  Roisin, I have heard that when the uterus comes out, within 5 yrs the vaginal vault collapses bringing the bladder and/or the bowel down because the ligaments are gone that hold everything in place. Even friends who didn't have prolapses and had a hysterectomy for other reasons, have bad backache ever since.  It makes us so helpless as women, meanwhile I too will do the exercises.  They help day to day with the symptoms but it is not a permanent solution.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  19 Jul 2010

Hi Brigid, well I wouldn't say a gyne telling you he would not perform an oophorectomy is a plus! In fact, NOT removing the ovaries (a vital source of oestrogen even after menopuase to keep women healthy) is standard clinical practice, unless of course they are diseased. In  fact, if any gyne tells you s/he will remove the ovaries, then unless there is an extremely good medically reason, I'd run a mile. Yes, major surgery, I would think is senseless except as a very last resort when all other options hysave been tried and failed. My friend had her operation done in St. Vincent's hospital in South Dublin. She had health insurance at the time so the wait was quite short - just a few weeks. Her recovery went well and the op was a success. 

 

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Brigid  ·  18 Jul 2010

Thanks again Anon, Could you tell me where your friend had the op done here? My prolapse is one degree for the uterus but the bladder is well down. The gyno. I saw said he wouldn't take out the ovaries so I suppose that is a plus but of course as you said it is major to have the uterus out and seems senseless to me when it is healthy. I am not going to rush into anything so drastic but I must admit I am getting a bit fed up with how it affects my life. My friends also encourage to have it done while I'm otherwise healthy and not leave it until I am older and maybe not so healthy.

 

14 Posts

Roisin  ·  16 Jul 2010

I had a prolapsed womb removed, all was great for about 6 to 8 months. Then my bladder prolapse, when I went back to the Gyne, I was told it was because I smoked. The Doctors cop out, he said nothing to me about smoking when he met me in the grounds of the hospital after the opt having a smoke. He then suggested a ring, they went out with the high button boots. I have thought of a repair but I believe they do not last. Meanwhile I am doing the exercise for the muscles, which seem to help.

 

14 Posts

Brigid  ·  15 Jul 2010

Thanks for that Anon but we are very different ages.  I think doctors are more inclined to preserve the uterus if you are still childbearing age.  I am 62 and post menopausal but my sexual organs are still very important to me.  I live in Dublin but to get the right surgeon I would be prepared to travel.  I don't have to wear pads but I always feel I want to go while walking even if I have just been.  I also find it hard to empty my bladder sometimes when it's full and that is so uncomfortable.  I just want to get this problem solved.

 

2 Posts

anon  ·  15 Jul 2010

reply to Brigid - I had an operation last Sept to repair prolapse, rectocele, urinary incontinence (tvt sling inserted) etc etc. also had mirena inserted. Operation a success as promised and carried out in  the Bons Galway. Mirena didnt work, not a problem - had this removed a month ago and a thermal ablation done to cure those awful crippling heavy periods. My god I am so happy with the results!!! No more pads... no more bleeding.. no more (ugh) peeing without warning .. and best of all .. spontaneous love making - no more checking beforehand, removing pads etc etc. very unsexy.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  14 Jul 2010

Hi Brigid, a repair of a prolapse is quite possible provided the prolapse is not extremely acute. Yes, male gynes here and the UK and more especially in the U.S. are somtimes too quick to take out wombs if a women if past menopause, unless she is informed and insists on discussing other options. Old fashioned surgeons are of the impression that becuase a woman can no longer bear children, her womb is somehow unimportant - aside of course for the fact that hysterectomy, like any organ removal is major surgery. Of course unless ovaries are cancerous or very diseased, they should not be removed, as they are the equivalent for women, as testicles are for men.. 

A similar op is available here - a friend of mine had it done. It was about 15 or 16 years ago (maybe more) so I don't know if it was done as keyhole surgery. It's similar in that the tendons or ligaments which support the womb are shortened and so can support it again. Similar is done with the bladder - tho that is well established surgery. Another, older op is available (an aunt of mine had it done years ago) where they put, what she described as a ribbon, like a sling, under the womb to hold it in place, so that might be a consideration for you as well.

 

14 Posts

Brigid  ·  13 Jul 2010

Looking for a gynaecologist who will repair prolapse without hysterectomy.  I believe male gynos are not sympathetic to women and are too quick to take out wombs.  Our wombs are as important to us as testicles are to men.  Just because they are on the inside they think they are not important.  In the US they do a keyhole op which consists of shortening the stretched tendons and reattaching them thus putting the uterus back in place and deal with the bladder in much the same way.  Why can't Irish surgeons update their skills, there is no change in 20 yrs in the way they deal with prolapses in women. Of course taking out the uterus (which is not diseased) vaginally makes the op easier for them to deal with. I despair of the Irish Health System dealing with women's problems.

 

7 Posts

Missey  ·  17 Dec 2008

Hi Anon,

Thanks so much for your advice, its nice to have frank advice. I have managed to go to my doctor who's going to forward me onto a gyne, so hopefully i will get to the bottom of this.

Thanks again,

Missey

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  16 Dec 2008

Hi Missey. Being overweight and a smoker are not indicative of prolapse and nor do they cause it. Howevr, the fact that you wet quite a lot does sound, if not like a prolapse then very definitely something you should seek medical attention for. You and every one of us, deserve better then having to wear a sanitary towel every day. As a formerly obese women, I can assure you that being overweight never resulted in stress incontinence. Lower back pain does sound like its prolapse related. Howevr swabs , while they will help diagnose infection won't show up a prolapse.Certainly prolapse is more commonly childbirth related (more common in women who have had children) but it's not unheard of in other women. But the best thing you can do is go to your doctor. Go to a womans health clinic if it makes you feel more comfortable

 

7 Posts

Missey  ·  13 Dec 2008

thanks for that Bobby

 

13 Posts

bobbymac  ·  12 Dec 2008

Hi Missey,  I'm not a doctor myself but I am pretty sure that being overweight does not automatically make you wee all the time whether you want to or not.    It does sound like you have a prolapse which could cause the incontinence.  I've no idea what the lump might be. You need to get checked out as soon as you can.  Do go to see your GP and get a referral to a gynaecologist who will have the appropriate training to help you. Whatever the lump turns out to be, you are better off knowing in time to hopefully get it sorted. 

 

7 Posts

Missey  ·  12 Dec 2008

Hi All, I have just joined this site as I'm worried about my health. I'm 30 years old and i'm a bit "innocent" when it comes to some issues especially if they relate to embarrassing problems. I am looking for a bit of advice in relation to a prolapsed womb. I have a few questions, and if anyone could answer them, i'd be really grateful. firstly i think i may have a prolapesd womb, and to be honest its only recently i have heard of this. I have found a lump near my vulva, which wasnt there before, and when my partner touches it, even gently it feels like im being stabbed to death. the pain is excruitating. I also am overweight, and i smoke!!! And if it couldnt get any worse....I also wet myself a lot, as in dribbles of urine just come out of me even if i'm harldly moving. I have been overweight practally all my life and i just assumed every fat person wet themselves? my mother told me years ago to just wear a sanitry towel every day and my clothes wouldnt get dirty!! Now all that topped with constant lower back pain (which i put down to my weight) and racing to the loo after a glass of water....its no joke these days and gets worse for every year i age! My jobs all my life would have entailed lifting some pretty heavy boxes too,,,,which im sure works wonders for my overall health too!! (i'm sounding about 90 now!!)

So i went to the nurse who took swabs and they have come back clear, but i dont think she realsies where the lump is and i was trying to explain it to her, but i felt she wasnt paying attention??

the other thing i have to say is that i havent had any children so my womb would never have been under that type of strain, and from what i can gather from the comments here, most who have it have had a child or children??

Now i am going to a doctor as soon as i can pluck up the courage to put all my exposures out there....thank god this is anonymous....But i'm basically wondering of any women who have had this have had similar symptoms as me and if they have any advice for me

 

13 Posts

bobbymac  ·  02 Dec 2008

Thank you for your posting, Anonymous (1/12/08 @10.13) It's a relief to know that the weight training wasn't the cause. That doctor who said it was left me blaming myself for the problem. I now have an appointment for corrective surgery in February next year.

 

12,082 Posts

Anonymous  ·  01 Dec 2008

Bobby, weight training if done properly does not cause a prolapse. Katie, my auntie had the same problem as you from exactly the same cause - damage from a traumatic delievery. In her case she insisted on a referral to a gyane and had the corrective surgery. she was able to concieve and went onto have two more babies once she had the surgery and c-section deliveries meant her pelvic floor was preserved and she didn't risk further damage nccessitating a hysterectomy. Exercises for the pelvic floor are important but they don't reverse a prolapse.

 

2 Posts

smiley  ·  01 Dec 2008

I am currently going to physio for bulge of the uterine wall, physio believes that this will improve with pelvic floor exercises. I was referred by gynae, he told me that it won't cause any problems with having more children and they won't do corrective surgery until I am finished having my family as giving birth again will just undo the surgery. Hope this is helpful to you.

 

2 Posts

cutiekatie  ·  28 Nov 2008

Hi All,

i hve 7 month twins and think i have a prolapse of some sort. I had an epis and the babies were delivered by forceps and ventouse. I wonder if this has cause my problems. I have a bulge in my vaginal area. The gp said i might have slight prolapse and sent me for physio. She was happy i was doing my pelvic floors correctly. How long would it take to see an improvement ? Should i go to a gynae to see if i need corrective surgery. i want to have more kids but wonder would i be able to carry a baby with a prolapse. can anyone help?

thanks

 

13 Posts

bobbymac  ·  12 Aug 2008
To Anonymous of 11/08: Sounds like it is a prolapse, could be uterus or vaginal wall. I had this happen to me some years ago, went to the Well Woman Centre and was told it was my own fault for doing weight training. I wanted to maintain upper body strength and cardiovascular fitness. I've considered corrective surgery but the gynae I went to first, to ask about it, was really nasty and unhelpful so I backed off and left it. Haven't tried another gynae since.
 

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Anonymous  ·  11 Aug 2008
I've recently discovered a bulge at the opening to my vagina, I'm worried its a prolapse, I've made an appointment with my gynae for 2 weeks time, I'm 30 with a 2year old and baby of 10 months. I play football and was wondering if anyone can tell me if its ok to continue playing with a prolapse? I don't want to make things worse.
 

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Anonymous  ·  25 Feb 2008
The sling is wide band which is sutured in place - rather like a wide ribbon, to hold the womb in position and slow or prevent the worsening of the prolapse. It is usually used if a ring (often used in pregnancy) is not suitable to keep the womb in place.
 

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Anonymous  ·  23 Feb 2008
I am 40 yrs and about to have my 5th child. I have suffered with urinary incontinence since my third child and found a good physiotherapist in galway and the nurotech machine fantastic. I have been told to have the tvt sling after this baby. Does anybody know what this involves?
 

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Anonymous  ·  21 Jan 2008
Amazing! I would say yes, you can still swim, provided of course the cervical area is not exposed. I would say be very careful of using weights or anything that would strain the pelvic floor.
 

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Anonymous  ·  21 Jan 2008
Do you know if it is ok to swim and go to the gym though if you have a prolapsed womb??????
Yeah I've been on a website that claims you can lift the pelvic floor back into place if at the very early stages!!!!!
Thanks. Just really concerned at the moment can I still swim and exercise having my womb prolapsing slightly???
 

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Anonymous  ·  21 Jan 2008
Pelvic floor exercise to reverse a prolapsed womb?
This is new.
I know you can Do kegels to strengthen the pelvic floor after childbirth and physical therapy will help with urinary incontinence after birth.
But I didn't know prolapse could be treated any other way than by intervention.
 

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Anonymous  ·  21 Jan 2008
I have a prolapsed womb and in the first stages and told that I can strengthen it by doing pelvic floor exercises....wondering if I can continue to go to the gym and swim. Any comments. Thanks.
Also heard there is a little device that can help with the pelvic floor exercises do you know if I can purchase this in Ireland.
 

14 Posts

Roisin  ·  08 Jun 2007
Hi Jim
I enquired awhile ago as to how having a Prolapsed uterus removed could cause a prolapsed bladder. I did tell my Doctor that I had caught a very bad cold with a server cough while visiting Canada. It was about six months after the operation and up to that I was great. His only answer was to put in a ring and say it was too soon for another operation, not unreasonable. However if I had been prepared to wear a ring I would not have bothered with an operation. Also he said the reason the bladder had prolapsed was because I SMOKED!!! The copout for all complaints to Doctors.
 

142 Posts

Jim  ·  30 May 2007
Brigid and Mary:
No I am not a doctor, but a member of the surgical team that does all sorts of abdominal repairs. It's my job to answer questions, coordinate after care and help folks thru the blizzard of paperwork. The surgical repair that I referred to is a sling or a wide band of surgical fabric that holds things in place. It is very similar to inguinal hernia repair, just more extensive. Hysterectomies are a different story. They involve quite a bit of tissue removal and usually require 5-6 weeks of light duty for recovery. In the senior population this could easily be 12-16 weeks. Most of them we do now are laparoscopic vs. open incision.
 

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Anonymous  ·  30 May 2007
Yes, Babs, you can - but you may have difficulty in retaining or continuing the pregnancy and it may present difficulty during the birth and of course the strain of pregnancy can present further problems for an already prolapsed womb.
If you are tryign for a baby, please get a) advice and b) the problem attended to first.
 

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Anonymous  ·  29 May 2007
can you get pregnant if your womb has dropped?
 

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Anonymous  ·  31 Mar 2007
Hi all, I am looking for much needed help and advice. I am a 28 year old mother of two boys -3 Ĺ & 12 weeks. In both pregnancies I developed bad pre-eclampsia. 14 weeks into my 2nd pregnancy I noticed something bulging below & went straight to the emergency, where I was told I had a prolapsed womb. They inserted a ring which had to be changed throughout pregnancy. I am not over weight, my 1st son was 7lb born and I never had multiple births so the reason I developed this is just down to weak muscles.

From 14 weeks my pregnancy was a disaster, I was so afraid I would miscarry. Thankfully I didnít but my son was born 6 weeks early after an awful birth. He was born naturally which I was thankfully for but it made the prolapse worse.

I am going to see a consultant in the next couple of weeks to discuss a repair. I would be very grateful if anyone could tell me what to expect and any procedures that may be discussed. Thanks
 

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Anonymous  ·  13 Jan 2006
Jim clearly is not a Dr. or knows nothing about most uterine surgery.
A hysterectomy is MAJOR operation. You are out of action - can't lift etc for 6 weeks at least.
Sensation depends on whether it is total or not - e.g. whether the cervix is removed.
I'm not sure if this apples but my aunt had a prolapse (again due to prolonged labour where she rightly should have had intervention) and had what she referred to as a sling - it's surgically inserted, like a wide ribbon which holds the womb up.
However, she was told that she will need pelvic floor surgery if / when she comes off HRT.
She does not want to have a healthy organ removed when another option is possible.
 

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Anonymous  ·  09 Jan 2006
I am concerned about a friend with a prolapsed whom who works as a housekeeper. Is she putting herself at further risk by lifting and doing certain jobs?
 
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