Dyspraxia

28 Comments
Sort by
Join the discussion...

3 Posts

Dyspraxia  ·  28 May 2018

My email address is sheehan.linda@yahoo.co.uk. Abbie likes Taylor Swift (we are going to concert in Dublin soon), Twenty One Pilots & Anne Marie (she was support act to Ed Sheeran). It would be great to meet up some time. 

 

3 Posts

Dyspraxia  ·  25 May 2018

We would be very interested in meeting up. I am not sure how to make contact also. Am i allowed to put up my email address or can Irish Health forward it ? 

 

1 Posts

mias mom  ·  25 May 2018

Hi Mom from Cork, who wrote in on the 8th may 2018... my daughter would love to meet your daughter... my daughter is also dyspraxic...and when I read her your post she said "that is me"... I wonder what music she likes.... lol.... don't know how to make contact ..but my daughter would love to meet your daughter...my daughter is 14 .. (but has a 16 year old pal .. and they have been pals for the past 6 years...) 

 

3 Posts

Dyspraxia  ·  08 May 2018

Hello. My 16 year old daughter has dyspraxia & dyscalculia. She is tired from being different & i was wondering are there any teenagers in Cork City who would be willing to meet up as her self esteem & confidence are at an all time low. She enjoys listening to music which she says "releases her". I would appreciate any advice from parents also. 

 

1 Posts

loretta (KOD73433)  ·  04 Aug 2008
Hi,
My daughter is 14 and I found out she had dyspraxia at 10 years old. She could not do the normal things for her age, ride bike, tie her laces, making friends very difficult. She is now a teenager and i am finding it more and more difficult as she has not made any friends in secondary school at all. The summer is the most difficult time as she does not hear from anybody all summer long. Also she is a only child which means she depends on me for company all the time. I sent her to the gaelteacht for the past few weeks which has been both difficult for me and her as I would like her to be able to engage and talk to people her own age. She has problems with doing hair, showering, talking to the other girls, dressing and walking everywhere has been a nightmare as she hates to walk. I would love if somebody could give me some guidance or information re what i can do to help as i am finding it quiet difficult myself and nobody really understands what dyspraxia is all about.
 

23 Posts

Cathy  ·  30 Dec 2007
He there Tully, your information was very much appreciated. I have a 15 yr old son with dyspraxia and on Alex Richardsons advice he changed from Eye Q to MorEPA,i'l let you know how he gets on. My son finds it hard to make friends now hes a teenager, hes so much more immature and cant make up his own mind on anything, He did have one close friend but he moved and its hard to watch him on his own. The dyspraxia assoc. have mentioned they are to open a teen group soon so 'lm hoping !

12222

 

2 Posts

anne (EWB41088)  ·  29 Jan 2006
Can anyone give me information on educational options for children with dyspraxia as I am researching it at the moment and I have observed a young boy with it in playschool but I wondered what will primary or secondary be like for him. Any information would be appreciated.
Thank you
Anne Byrne
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  16 Nov 2003
I am a parent of a child with dyspraxia and I would like to tell you about a booklet which I received. It is brilliant and gives loads of tips and advice for parents. There was a mother on Morning Ireland talking about her child and also a doctor talking about the ailment. I found it very interesting and rang for this booklet . While talking on the phone I found out that it was from the Dyspraxia/DCD Association, Cork. I must say that I find the booklet great.
 

2 Posts

John (Johnmark)  ·  11 Nov 2003
Dear All,
It is over a year now since our son (now 6 years of age) was diagnosed as having Dyspraxia.The assessment was carried out by a chartered physiotherapist in Cork, who specialises in this area. After diagnosis, our son attended her clinic for 10 consecutive weeks and thereafter had to maintain an exercise regime at home.The results were very encouraging, and in conjunction with daily intake of a long-chain fatty acid supplement ('eye-Q' or 'Efalex') which can be purchased over the counter at most large pharmacies, he has made great strides with respect to tasks that were previously very difficult for him e.g. buttoning of shirts, writing, and maintaining balance. If people want the name and address of the Physiotherapist, I can be contacted at j.osullivan@claymon.ie
 

159 Posts

Charlotte (cbreen)  ·  10 Nov 2003
It's easy to say 'Don't worry about it' if you're not the one with the dodgy balance! Not so easy when you are the one falling over! I spoke with a friend who works as a psychologist for the Med Board, and when I asked her about getting a diagnosis for Dyspraxia, she asked why. I said I'd like to confirm whether or not it was true. She pointed out that I already knew it whether it was true, so what was a diagnosis going to do for me at the age of 30? It's a fair point. Read the symptoms. If it's like a dawning of understanding, and a mystery at last deciphered, then chances are, yes, you are dyspraxic. No-one else can understand what you feel like inside your head. However, to all parents of dyspraxic children out there, I've learned to drive, and am perfectly 'functional' even if I still am covered in bruises, from misjudguing doorways, and still occasionally poke myself in the eye with a toothbrush. Tell your children that it's important that they concentrate on every step of a task, and not let their attention wander until the task is complete. When I'm tired, I still do things like go to put a glass on a table, and finish the action in my head, before it's actually finished in reality. That's when the glass gets dropped an inch from the edge of the table, or clips the edge of the table, or is dropped onto the table from a couple of inches above... Above all, let them know they are not stupid. And don't let anyone tell them, 'You're clumsy because you're just not concentrating'. It goes beyond that. It's difficult to concentrate for long periods of time on every aspect of every action. This is particularly so for a child. As their powers of concentration improve, as everyone's does, over time, they will find it occurs less. Mind you, I still avoid activities where my lack of physical co-ordination might put others at risk. I still figure I could potentially take out a whole slope of skiers, if I were to take to the piste! But I have a full driving license, and my no claims bonus is intact.
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  10 Nov 2003
When I get up early in the morning, I tend to have difficulty getting my balance, seem to stagger for a couple of minutes and can't co-ordinate my movements. Is this somethign to do with Dyspraxia? My blood pressure is fine and I have no imbalance in my middle ear. I was always clumsy as a child and still am but was never diagnosed with anything. GP is of no help and says I'm worrying over nothing
 

3 Posts

Eileen (EileenLouise)  ·  09 Nov 2003
I SAT DOWN THE OTHER NIGHT & WROTE THIS BECAUSE AS YOU GO THROUGH THE UPSET & UPHEAVAL IN YOUR HOME DUE TO DYSPRAXIA/DCD - JUST REMEMBER THE PROBABILITY THAT MANY MORE OF US ARE GOING THROUGH SIMILAR TRAUMA AT THAT EXACT MOMENT. IN OTHER WORDS “YOU ARE NOT ALONE”

LIVING WITH DYSPRAXIA /DCD

As a mother living with Dyspraxia /DCD is very difficult. Sometimes it is like waiting for an explosion to happen, you never know when it will occur. Will it be, because he finds it difficult to tie his button or because his sister says the wrong thing before school or that he bumps into the door. It really doesn’t matter what causes it because sure as sure it will happen.
Someone recently asked me what is the hardest thing about dyspraxia/ DCD. I must honestly say that I have always found the behaviour problems to be the worst. Dyspraxic children are not bold or spoilt,these behaviour outbursts stem from the extreme frustration that they experience in knowing what they want to do or say but not being able to correctly plan and carry out the motor tasks. It can affect speech, chewing, writing, eye/hand co-ordination, running,etc. Normal skills which automatically come to children would have to be taught to a dyspraxic child.
Nobody can understand what it is like to have a dyspraxic child, unless you are living with it.The hours and hours that a mother has to put in just to help him to perform everyday tasks. Homework is a nightmare and takes forever to complete. Dinner is a disaster area. Showers are diabolical. Sleepovers for the older children are non existent. Anything out of the everyday routine is a major challenge for our son. Guess what,he looks the same as any other eight year old. One would never know the hardship that he goes through day by day.
When our son was six years old we were struggling over the homework when he asked, “Mom, why do the words go missing in my head” I thought for a minute and answered “because you have something called dyspraxia, the words will come back eventually, just remember it is not the end of the world, after all everybody has something, some people have asthma,others have migraines, just remember everybody has something even when you can’t see it”.
He replied “Oh that’s okay so, Mom it could be worse”
Yes it could be worse…..which is why I think that it is important to think positive and to make the learning process fun whether it is teaching them to chew, write, talk, hop, skip, throw a ball, use the toothbrush etc. etc. and yes it is exhausting and takes so much time and patience but a mother’s love knows no bounds. It is like infinity!!!!
Written by Eileen O’Sullivan , 9th June,2003.
Mother and Committee Member of The Dyspraxia /DCD Association, Cork.
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  04 Sep 2003
The following links might help some of you looking for help privately... Our son has been seeing an osteopath for the past 2 months to help him with his posture and clumsiness. He really enjoys the sessions and we have seen a slight improvement in his gross motor coordination as well as social behaviour. Also, Neuro-Developmental Therapy apparently treats children and adults with a wide range of specific learning difficulties including Dyspraxia. Their site is extremely informative and ir provides a list of therapists throughout Ireland...
http://www.ndt-ireland.com/
http://www.mypotential.ie/osteopathy/practitioners.html
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  03 Sep 2003
Dear Charlotte-
Many thanks for your lead! The desk from SuperValu is pretty much what we were looking for... Our son's school didn't even know where slanted/angled desks could be sourced. I wonder why something so helpful has suddenly disappeared from the market place? Surely a lot of children would benefit from those good old fashioned desks!
 

159 Posts

Charlotte (cbreen)  ·  29 Aug 2003
There's a desk with a slanted top on a special offer thingy (spend a fortune, and collect little stamps) in Supervalu at the minute. I don't know who the manufaturer is, but maybe someone else did, or perhapos you could drop into your local Supervalu and get the name yourself?
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  28 Aug 2003
I have read that slanted desks are best for young children who are suffering from dyspraxia. I have tried to source one here in Ireland but can not find a single furniture store/manufacturer who sells such desks. Has anyone got any ideas on this? I would be grateful for an address/name to check out...
 

1 Posts

Sinead (sineadpcarroll)  ·  13 Aug 2003
Does anyone have a name or contact details of someone who might be able to asess my son privately. We have been through the mill for the last six years and he is on multiple public waiting lists!!! We live in Limerick and are desperate although I must say it is reassuring to know we are not alone...Please help.
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  13 Aug 2003
What are the contact details for National Dyspraxia Association
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  13 Aug 2003
When I get up early in the morning, I tend to have difficulty getting my balance, seem to stagger for a couple of minutes and can't co-ordinate my movements. Is this somethign to do with Dyspraxia or is it an imbalance in my middle ear. My blood pressure is ok. I was always clumsy as a child but was never diagnosed with anything.
 

1 Posts

Ann (anniegoddard)  ·  11 Aug 2003
I recognise many of the symptoms as applying to my 10 yr old son. He is very bright, and not badly affected although his lack of co-ordination and some speech difficulties do single him out from others of his age. I am interestd to know the experiences of those who have received help in or outside of the school system, as I am also concerned about the counter effects of being singled out for attention. I live in England, so realise that the situation may be quite different here.
 

1 Posts

John (John_O_S)  ·  06 Aug 2003
My Name is john O'Sullivan,
I am the Chairperson of the Dyspraxia / DCD Association Cork. There is also a Dyspraxia Association in Galway and there is National Dyspraxia Association based in Dublin. All 3 associations are run by parents of children with Dyspraxia and our focus is to lobby the Dept of health and our political representatives for resources to help our children to deal with this problem.
For those people living in the Cork North & South Lee area there is a DCD unit in St Finbarrs Hospital Cork that is focused on assessing and treating Children with Dyspraxia / DCD. This is of course very much under resourced but it is there and that is a start. This is currently a pilot program unit and the Cork Dyspraxia Association is working hard to have this unit established as a permanent entity. We have taken out case directly to Michéal Martin and we continue to work with him and the SHB on this matter.
However if you live in the Cork North & South Lee area and you have a suspicion that your child is Dyspraxic then you should ask your Doctor for a referral to be seen by Dr Pat Henn of the DCD unit St Finbarrs Hospital Cork.

To all parents I would say the following
1) Form Dyspraxia associations in your county and start to lobby. The squeaky wheel always gets the oil.
2) Get a referral and assessment for your child as soon as you can . Go private if necessary. If you get intervention therapy for your child at an early age and work at it with your child on a continual basis you should see a marked improvement " we did ". The therapy should not difficult to do once a medical professional shows you how to apply it.
3) If you live in either Cork or Galway join the local Dyspraxia/ DCD associations. If you are outside of Cork or Galway then join the National association based in Dublin and consider starting a local association within your own county. The National association will help you to get started.

If you wish to join the Cork Dyspraxia / DCD association you can call 021-7332354.

Please not that I am a parent of a dyspraxic child and not a medical professional so the advice I have given above is only based on our experience with our child and the feedback from other Association members who have hade an intervention therapy designed for and applied to their child.
 

1 Posts

Maria (miamise)  ·  30 Jun 2003
my little boy was diagnosed with dyspraxia last october after battling with the specialist in the hospital to see my son . thank god for a great gp who gave me great support. i was informed my little man did have dyspraxia and then sent on my merry way given alot of false information leading to dead ends and sent to areas that have nothing to do with treating dyxpraxia my advice keep on banging on doors. nearly a year later and im no nearer getting help for my little man but im not giving in or giving up. I know with dyspraxia to take it in stages and set routines and it does help
 

3 Posts

tully33  ·  26 Feb 2003
Sorry, I forgot to add this to my message. I am also a primary school teacher, and there is a complete lack of information on dyspraxia, as the previous poster said. I don\'t know the reason for this, I can only speculate that dyspraxia is a \"recent\" learning disability in Ireland, I\'ve been teaching 10 years and I never heard a mention of it anywhere until my brother was diagnosed. Also, there are more \"severe\" cases of it than others. Like I said already, my brother went all the way through primary school without his teachers remarking on it.
Apparently lots of dyspraxics are not noticed unless they have some other learning difficulty also, which is often the case.
There are some good websites on the Internet in relation to this. There is an Irish Dyspraxia Foundation, which might be of use to someone with a young dyspraxic, but my family did not find them helpful when it came to our teenage dyspraxic! The UK group is longer established, and also have an excellent website. The two main writers and researchers on the topic are Madeleine Portwood and Dr Alex Richardson. They are currently doing research on the role of fatty acids in helping dyspraxics, type their names into any search engine and you\'ll come up with lots of info.
Like I said in my last post, if anyone has a query, I\'d be happy to try to answer it, either from the point of view of being the sister of a dyspraxic, or being a teacher.
Tully
 

3 Posts

tully33  ·  26 Feb 2003
My 19 year old brother has been diagnosed as dyspraxic, but his diagnosis didn't come until he was 14. He was diagnosed in Our Ladys in Crumlin, and we had to travel from Cork to have him officially diagnosed there. I think most educational psychologists are now qualified to do the diagnosis, so maybe a referral from a GP would do the trick, for anyone who wishes to have themselves tested.
Obviously, my brother missed out on all extra help during his school years, we all knew that there was something wrong with him, but we didn't quite know what until we read an article in "Bella" magazine!! :)) Anyone who has dyspraxia is entitled to lots of extra help/resource teaching hours at school, as well as exemptions in Leaving/Junior Cert.
Anyone with questions, feel free to ask me.
tully
 

2 Posts

John (Johnmark)  ·  21 Feb 2003
Our 5 year old boy has recently been diagnosed(finally) as being Dyspraxic although my wife has known there was someting wrong from about 2 1/2 years of age.Numerous visits to GP's were met with the usual patronising rebuffs to the effect that my wife was engaging in paranoid parenting.
My question to people out there in a similar position is that if the prevalence figures for boys of between 3-6 % are to be believed,why the lack of knowledge among general practitioners specifically, but also among educationalists?
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  08 Aug 2002
Parts of your dyspraxia description apply to my offspring aged 20 who has yet to have a positive educational experience. Where can I check if this is the case>
 

- Posts

Anonymous  ·  08 Aug 2002
I am after discovering that I might of had Dispraxia as a child. I learnt to walk when I was 19 months old and never crawled. My parents were really worried but the Docs couldn´t figure out what was wrong with me back in 1977, they thought I was a lazy baby or something. I had to live with that shame for years since my family used to compare me with my cousin who seemed brighter and was 7 months younger and started walking when I was just starting to. I always felt stupid. And when I was in pre-school the teacher told my parents that I was too slow in coordinating movements and I had to hear those humiliating comments growing up, imagine how I felt? I wasn´t a great dancer either so I had to give it up before making a complete fool of myself and I was the only one at age 11 in the classroom who seemed to have problems in understanding maths, the teachers thought I was too imaginative to think logically and that gave me a huge complex and I gave up all hopes of ever being able to understand maths altogether, according to the teachers I passed all the final math exams due to my intelligence and good memory!! Then again, I was very good at languages and communicating, according to my parents I learnt to talk before I even started walking and I learnt to cycle aged 5 with no problems, I was very good at reading and writing, and never had any problems with the shoelaces. Now aged 26, I love dancing despite the fact that sometimes I have difficulties following the steps, but if I dance just following the music not minding the steps, then I am very good at it and I finally feel relieved after all these years of thinking I could never dance. I am delighted I came across this article about Dispraxia, Cheers !!!
 

159 Posts

Charlotte (cbreen)  ·  03 Jul 2002
I'm thirty, and figure this is possibly what I've been struggling with my entire life. I'm consistantly covered in bruises and cuts, I miss doorways and wallop myself off the doorway instead, walk into desks, have poor 'catch and throw' skills and was terrified of learning to drive. I got my full license last year, but still hate reversing, as I'm never sure which way I should turn the wheel in reverse.

Is there a way to get a diagnosis of dyspraxia, one way or the other, for an adult? It would be nice to know for sure. A label is helpful in coping! I'm slightly dyslexic, and figure the two might well be linked. Any info out there?
C
 
Write a comment...