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(Monday, 22nd Dec, 2014)

Over 141,000 adults with diabetes here

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Anonymous  ·  17 Nov 2008
Killa there are already controls on what can go into food so that dangerous substances are not used in ingredients which can harm / poison. Beyond that, almost anything in excess can be dangerous and it is down to people to become informed.
Most large pharmacies can do a blood sugar metering test now.
 

5 Posts

killabegger  ·  14 Nov 2008
there are people out there who do not know they have it. i was tested for it after nearly going out of my mind thinking i was going mad with the signs of diabetes. this test should be free. it would save the HSE a lot of money and people a lot of anguish. also the government should have strict controls of what goes into food that can damage a person's health. most of these people are hard workers trying to keep their heads above water
 

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Anonymous  ·  20 Jun 2006
No, no, I don't feel you were attacking me at all Mick. It's useful for us all to have these things clarified.
 

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Anonymous  ·  19 Jun 2006
I would just like comment on the fact that despite the incidence of diabetes being highest in the west, the department of health still assigns more health care resources for diabtes to the eastern part of the country ie Dublin [probably because of its population number]. Perhaps because of this report they could review this, as at present the health care resources for diabetes outside the dublin area is far below what is neccessary to deliver an adequate service to patients with diabetes.
 

10 Posts

micksmixxx  ·  15 Jun 2006
Mary,

I apologise if you feel that I was attacking you. That was never my intention. I simply wished to clarify matters.

As you say, Type 2 diabetics who develop diabetes later in life, who make lifestyle modifications may greatly help to manage their condition. It's also true that some wouldn't even develop diabetes, but most people (in my humble opinion) wouldn't make those changes until they found out that they'd developed diabetes. Even then, some would not change.

I would add that similar lifestyle modifications also help Type 1 diabetics to gain (or maintain) good control. It also seems to help prevent further complications.
 

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Anonymous  ·  15 Jun 2006
Perhaps I didn't make myself clear, what I meant was there are a number of people who are born with type 1, they are diabeteic and insulin dpendat from birth. Whereas for those who get type 2 diabetes later in life, lifestyle modification may greatly help to manage and even prevent it for some.
 

10 Posts

micksmixxx  ·  15 Jun 2006
Is it just me? I don't follow Dr. Balanda's logic when he says "one of the main recommendations of the report is the urgent need to develop a national diabetes register, 'which will enable us to establish how many cases of diabetes are undiagnosed'." Surely this would tell us the number of people who have already been diagnosed.

I don't mean to pick flies, Mary, but Type 1 diabetics are not necessarily born with the condition. You are, however, correct in stating that Type 1 diabetics does not produce insulin. I didn't develop it until I was 21. (It was formerly known as Juvenile Onset Diabetes as it tended to affect younger people more. There are now, more younger people developing Type 2 diabetes than at any time in the past ... this may be down to a number of things such as, obesity, lack of exercise, evironmental factors, etc. etc.)

Although I agree with the majority of what you say, Anonymous, particularly with regards to Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes being as serious as each other, Type 2 diabetics who go on to need insulin injections are not classed as insulin dependent. Insulin is seen as a treatment option.
 

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Anonymous  ·  14 Jun 2006
With all due respect Mary, why does that have to be distinguished? The condition is just as serious whether you have type 1 or type 2. There is a common myth that type 2 is not as serious, this is simply not true and most with type 2 will end up insulin dependent anyway.
 

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Anonymous  ·  14 Jun 2006
What needs to be distingushed I think, is whether it is type 1 diabetes - where people are born with it and their pancreas cannot produce insulin or diabetes as a result of prediabetes and type 2, where the pancreas can no longer produce enough insulin and then this gradually worsens
 

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Anonymous  ·  14 Jun 2006
Why a costly "population based study"? We know for sure there are many thousands with diabetes. Kieran O'Leary should go ahead and plan services now, "stop the talking and start walking" - people are dying with this "silent killer" every day that passes. One can improve on the plan as things progress. There's too much wasted talk, time and money. Forget the "Nero fiddling while Rome burned" philosophy. Do it now.......
 
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