What constitutes a "good" hearing test?
Pure Tone Air Test
Bone Conduction Test
Speech Reception Threshold Test
Speech Discrimination Test
What are Audiograms?

What constitutes a "good" hearing test?

A complete hearing test consists of the following components:
Pure Tone Air Conduction test
Bone Conduction test
Speech Reception Threshold test and
Speech Discrimination test.

Pure Tone Air Test

This is when audiologist (hearing specialist) places headphones over your ears and plays different tones. You are told to indicate when you can hear each tone. This test will determine how well you hear at different frequencies. The normal human car can hear tones from 20 to 20,000 cycles per second.

Bone Conduction Test

During the Bone Conduction test an instrument is placed against the mastoid bone, which is just behind your ear. The tester then plays the same tones as you heard during the Pure Tone Air testing. You then indicate when you hear the tones. This test will determine whether your hearing loss is due to outer or middle ear problems, or is related to inner ear nerve damage.

Speech Reception Threshold Test

The Speech Reception Threshold is the softest point at which you are able to repeat words correctly 50% of the time. The Speech Reception Threshold test indicates the level of sound you need before you can hear and understand words.

Speech Discrimination Test

Test words given at normal speech levels indicate how the patient is functioning without hearing aids. In the conventional Speech Discrimination test, the hearing specialist presents 25 to 50 standardised words to you, which you are asked to repeat.

What are Audiograms?

Audiograms are charts used to record the results of some types of hearing test. They show how loud a sound has to be, before a person will hear it (without hearing-aids). Separate audiograms will be completed for the left and right ears. This is because you may have difficulty hearing in one ear (unilateral loss) or in both ears (bilateral loss).